Song Hye-rim Sung Hye Rim

Song Hye-rim Sung Hye Rim

Song Hye-rim

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This is a Korean name ; the family name is Song .

Song Hye-rim
Song Hye-rim portrait.jpg
Native name
성혜림
Born(1937-01-24)24 January 1937

Changnyeong , Japanese Korea
(now South Gyeongsang , South Korea )
Died18 May 2002(2002-05-18) (aged 65)

Moscow , Russia
Partner(s) Kim Jong-il (1968–2002; her death)
Children Kim Jong-nam
Song Hye-rim
Chosŏn’gŭl
성혜림
Hancha
成蕙琳
Revised Romanization Seong Hye-rim
McCune–Reischauer Sŏng Hyerim

Song Hye-rim ( Chosŏn’gŭl : 성혜림; 24 January 1937 – 18 May 2002) [1] was a North Korean actress, best known for being the one-time favored mistress of Kim Jong-il .

Contents

  • 1 Early life and education
  • 2 Personal life
  • 3 Defection and death
  • 4 See also
  • 5 Notes
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links

Early life and education[ edit ]

Song was born in Changnyeong when Korea was under Imperial Japanese rule . She entered Pyongyang Movie College in 1955, but left the following year to give birth to a daughter. She later re-enrolled and graduated, having her film debut in 1960. She became a popular actress in the 1960s, appearing in movies including Onjŏngryŏng ( Chosŏn’gŭl : 온정령) and Baek Il-hong ( Chosŏn’gŭl : 백일홍).

Most accounts of Song are drawn from the memoirs of her sister, Song Hye-rang . Her former friend Kim Young-soon published her memoir I Am Song Hye-rim’s friend, and revealed that she and her family were sent to a concentration camp for ten years after she found out Hye-rim’s secret (namely, that she was Kim Jong-il’s mistress, a fact that was hidden at the time even from Kim Il-sung), which resulted in the death of her children and parents and her husband being taken away and never seen again before she managed to defect to South Korea in 2003. [2] [3] [4] [5]

Personal life[ edit ]

Song began dating Kim Jong-il in 1968, after divorcing her first husband; she is believed to have been his first mistress. In 1971, she gave birth to Kim Jong-nam , who at one time was believed to be favoured to succeed Kim Jong-il. The birth of her son is said to have been kept secret from Kim Il-sung until 1975. [6]

Defection and death[ edit ]

Starting in the early 1980s, Song travelled to Moscow frequently for medical care. In 1996 Song was reported to have defected to the West, but intelligence officials in South Korea denied the story. She is reported to have died on 18 May 2002. [1] [7] Some reports say she died in Moscow . [8] [9]

See also[ edit ]

  • Biography portal
  • flag North Korea portal
  • History of North Korea
  • Woo In-hee

Notes[ edit ]

  1. ^ a b 北 김정남 생모 ‘성혜림의 묘’를 찾아
  2. ^ “North Korean defector says Kim Jong Il stole her life” . Los Angeles Times.

  3. ^ “A N.Korean life shattered by Kim Jong-il’s secret” . Reuters. 3 February 2010.
  4. ^ AFD
  5. ^ “North Korean Defector Reveals The Horrifying Conditions Inside Secretive State’s Concentration Camps” . The Huffington Post. 12 October 2013. Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  6. ^ Lee (2005), par. 6
  7. ^ Empas (n.d.)
  8. ^ Lee (2005), sect. 4 par. 1
  9. ^ Michael Rank (18 February 2012). “North Korean secrets lie six feet under” . Asia Times Online.

References[ edit ]

  • “김정일의 동거녀 성혜림과 고영희” . DailyNK. 15 July 2005. Retrieved 23 May 2007.
  • “성혜림” . Empas 인물검색. Retrieved 23 May 2007.
  • Lee, Ki-dong (이기동) (26 January 2005). “김정일, 외모닮은 김정운 칭찬” . Choongang Monthly Magazine. Retrieved 23 May 2007.

External links[ edit ]

  • L.A. Times piece on Song’s childhood friend
  • v
  • t
  • e
Kim dynasty of North Korea
  • Kim Il-sung (1912–1994)
  • Kim Jong-il (1941–2011)
  • Kim Jong-un (1984–)
1st generation
  • Kim Hyong-jik (Kim Il-sung’s father)
  • Kang Pan-sok (Kim Il-sung’s mother)
2nd generation
  • Kim Jong-suk (Kim Il-sung’s first wife, Jong-il’s mother)
  • Kim Yong-ju (Kim Il-sung’s brother)
  • Kim Song-ae (Kim Il-sung’s second wife)
3rd generation
  • Hong Il-chon (Kim Jong-il’s first wife, divorced)
  • Song Hye-rim (Kim Jong-il’s first mistress)
  • Kim Man-il (Kim Jong-il’s brother)
  • Jang Song-thaek (Kim Jong-il’s brother-in-law)
  • Kim Kyong-hui (Kim Jong-il’s sister)
  • Kim Young-sook (Kim Jong-il’s wife)
  • Ko Yong-hui (Kim Jong-il’s second mistress, Jong-un’s mother)
  • Kim Pyong-il (Kim Jong-il’s half-brother)
  • Kim Ok (Kim Jong-il’s third mistress)
4th generation
  • Kim Yo-jong (Kim Jong-un’s sister)
  • Kim Jong-chul (Kim Jong-un’s brother)
  • Kim Sul-song (Kim Jong-un’s half-sister)
  • Kim Jong-nam (Kim Jong-un’s half-brother)
  • Ri Sol-ju (Kim Jong-un’s wife)
5th generation
  • Kim Ju-ae (Kim Jong-un’s daughter)
  • Kim Han-sol (Kim Jong-nam’s son)

Retrieved from ” https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Song_Hye-rim&oldid=856191882 ”
Categories :

  • 1937 births
  • 2002 deaths
  • Kim dynasty (North Korea)
  • North Korean expatriates in Russia
  • North Korean expatriates in the Soviet Union
  • People from South Gyeongsang Province
  • North Korean film actresses
  • 20th-century North Korean actresses
  • Burials in Troyekurovskoye Cemetery
  • 20th-century North Korean women
Hidden categories:

  • Use dmy dates from March 2013
  • Pages to import images to Wikidata
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              Death of North Korea’s Onetime Heir Sheds Light on Secretive Kim Dynasty



              • Jenny Lee

              FILE – This combination of file photos shows Kim Jong Nam, left, exiled half-brother of North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un, in Narita, Japan, on May 4, 2001, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on May 9, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea.
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              Death of North Korea’s Onetime Heir Sheds Light on Secretive Kim Dynasty

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              The apparent assassination of the estranged half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is drawing the world’s attention to the secretive Kim family’s inner circle.

              Kim Jong Nam, 45, died en route to a hospital Monday after he was reportedly poisoned by two women at Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur International Airport while waiting to take a Macau-bound flight, according to Malaysian and South Korean officials. Malaysian police have detained two women and one man in connection with the death. Authorities are hunting for other suspects.

              FILE - This image provided by Star TV of closed circuit television footage from Feb. 13, 2017, shows a woman, left, at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia, who police say was arrested Wednesday in connection with the death of Kim Jong Nam.

              FILE – This image provided by Star TV of closed circuit television footage from Feb. 13, 2017, shows a woman, left, at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia, who police say was arrested Wednesday in connection with the death of Kim Jong Nam.

              Selangor Police Chief Abdul Samah Mat told VOA Friday the hospital has not released final results of an autopsy that could determine the cause of the death. Abdul Samah, who is in charge of the investigation, said the police are trying to obtain DNA samples from the victim’s kin to confirm his identify.

              According to South Korean lawmakers briefed by the National Intelligence Service, there is reason to believe that Kim was killed on the orders of his younger half-brother Kim Jong Un, who is known to execute or depose anyone who appears to be a threat to the legitimacy of his rule. In late 2013, the North Korean leader executed his uncle Jang Song Thaek, who was widely deemed as the second-most powerful figure in the country.

              Jang Jin-sung, who worked as a psychological warfare officer for North Korea’s ruling Workers’ Party before he defected in 2004, told VOA that given Kim Jong Nam’s place as the firstborn child of Kim Jong Il, Kim Jong Un might have seen his brother’s existence as an obstacle to his grip on power.

              FILE - Kim Jong Nam, front row center, at Wonsan Beach in 1980. Rear row left to right, aunt Song Hye Rang, maternal grandmother Kim Won Ju, Li Nam Ok. (Source: Imogen O’Neil/The Golden Cage: Life with Kim Jong Il, A Daughter’s Story.)

              FILE – Kim Jong Nam, front row center, at Wonsan Beach in 1980. Rear row left to right, aunt Song Hye Rang, maternal grandmother Kim Won Ju, Li Nam Ok. (Source: Imogen O’Neil/The Golden Cage: Life with Kim Jong Il, A Daughter’s Story.)

              Secluded childhood

              Kim Jong Nam is the eldest son of the late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, who ruled the communist state from 1994 to 2011, and was once regarded as heir apparent to his father. The son was born on May 10, 1971. His mother was a South Korea-born film star, Song Hye Rim, who divorced her husband to become Kim Jong Il’s secret mistress.

              "Kim Jong Il wanted a family with the woman he loved, and now he had an heir, but he also needed to protect his position as his father’s successor," reads an unpublished memoir obtained by VOA and based on the oral accounts of Li Nam Ok, Song’s niece.

              Kim Jong Il kept the relationship with Song secret, especially from his father Kim Il Sung.

              Kim Jong Il almost completely insulated his son from the outside world. Li Nam Ok was his only playmate in Pyongyang. Kim, besotted with his son, forgave his "tantrums and capriciousness," according to French author Imogen O’Neil, who worked with Li on the memoir. Li left North Korea in 1992 and never returned.

              FILE - Kim Jong Nam rides on water skiing at Wonsan beach in 1987. (Source: Imogen O’Neil/The Golden Cage: Life with Kim Jong Il, A Daughter’s Story.)

              FILE – Kim Jong Nam rides on water skiing at Wonsan beach in 1987. (Source: Imogen O’Neil/The Golden Cage: Life with Kim Jong Il, A Daughter’s Story.)

              "His father refused him nothing; Kim Jong Il used to say there was only his son in his life," according to O’Neil’s manuscript.

              The memoir offers a rare glimpse into Kim Jong Nam’s childhood, adolescence and early manhood. It revealed that he lived in luxury in Pyongyang, surrounded by expensive goods virtually unseen in North Korea. His aunt, Song Hye Rang, who was Li’s mother, oversaw Kim’s private education, which covered math, science, English and Russian. When Kim was 8 years old, he visited Moscow, where his mother was receiving medical treatments.

              According to the memoir, Kim Jong Il decided to send the "little general" overseas for "structured education" on his son’s 10th birthday. For most of the 1980s, Kim Jong Nam lived in Switzerland, where he studied at the International School of Geneva.

              After returning to Pyongyang in 1988, Kim, who was known to be a computer enthusiast, held government posts. At one point, he was head of North Korea’s Computer Committee where he was in charge of developing information technology.

              FILE - North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, front left, poses with his first-born son Kim Jong Nam, front right, and his relatives in Pyongyang in this Aug. 19, 1981 photo.

              FILE – North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, front left, poses with his first-born son Kim Jong Nam, front right, and his relatives in Pyongyang in this Aug. 19, 1981 photo.

              Fall from grace

              Yoji Gomi, a senior staff writer at the newspaper Tokyo Shimbun closely followed Kim Jong Nam and published a book in 2012 that was based on correspondence with him. Gomi told VOA that upon returning from Switzerland, Kim had frequently advised his father to adopt the free market system to boost North Korea’s economy.

              "Kim told me that he had some friction with the supreme leader Kim Jong Il, and that’s when their relationship began to sour," Gomi said. "I believe that because of that friction, Kim was not able to become North Korea’s leader and, instead, he led an itinerant life" outside North Korea.

              Cheong Seong-chang, an expert on North Korea’s leadership and director of unification strategy at the Sejong Institute in Seoul, said Kim Jong Nam was sidelined from succession when Kim Jong Il’s third wife, Ko Yong Hui, a dancer born in Japan, gave birth to two sons, one of whom now rules North Korea.

              "It appears that after Kim Jong Chul and Kim Jong Un were born, Kim Jong Nam may have come as a burden to Kim Jong Il," the analyst said in an email to VOA. Kim Jong Chul was last seen in 2015 in London at an Eric Clapton concert, according to press reports.

              Some suspect that Kim Jong Nam fell out of favor with his father when he was arrested at Tokyo’s Narita Airport in 2001 as he attempted to enter Japan with a forged Dominican Republic passport. He told police at the time that he had traveled to Japan to visit Tokyo Disneyland with his four-year-old son and two unidentified women.

              FILE - A TV screen shows pictures of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and his older brother Kim Jong Nam, left, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Feb. 14, 2017.

              FILE – A TV screen shows pictures of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and his older brother Kim Jong Nam, left, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Feb. 14, 2017.

              Since then, Kim Jong Nam had been living in exile — mostly in Beijing and Macau — with his wife and children. Often spotted at hotels, casinos and airports throughout Southeast Asia, Kim was widely known for his gambling and drinking habits.

              In an interview with TV Asahi in 2010, shortly before his younger brother Kim Jong Un rose to power, Kim Jong Nam expressed his discontent with the Kim family’s three-generation dynasty.

              In 2012, Kim Han Sol, the then 16-year-old son of Kim Jong Nam, said during an interview with a Finnish TV channel that he didn’t know how his uncle Kim Jong Un "became a dictator."

              Feared for his life

              Seoul’s intelligence agency said Kim Jong Un had "a standing order" for his half-brother’s assassination and that there had been a botched attempt in 2012, according to South Korean lawmakers briefed by the agency.

              Following the failed attempt, Kim Jong Nam begged for his life in a letter addressed to Kim Jong Un, said the lawmakers.

              Kim Jong Nam’s family members are believed to be in Beijing and Macao under China’s protection, according to the South Korean intelligence agency.

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