Sodium acetate Sodium Acetate Decahydrate NaC2H3O2.10H2O Molecular Weight … - MywallpapersMobi

Sodium acetate Sodium Acetate Decahydrate NaC2H3O2.10H2O Molecular Weight …


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Question: What is the pH of a 0.100 M solution of NaC2H3O2 when
Ka(HC2H3O2) = 1.8 X 10-5? If you could be k…



What is the pH of a 0.100 M solution of NaC2H3O2 when
Ka(HC2H3O2) = 1.8 X 10-5? If you could be kind enough to clearly
show work and give an explanation for each step, that would really
help me learn it. I’ll love you forever <3

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Sodium acetate

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This article is about sodium acetate. For other uses of hot ice, see Hot ice (disambiguation) .
Sodium acetate
Skeletal formula of sodium acetate
Sodium acetate
Names
IUPAC name

Sodium acetate
Systematic IUPAC name

Sodium ethanoate
Other names

Hot ice (sodium acetate trihydrate)
Identifiers
CAS Number
  • anhydrous: 127-09-3  ☒N
  • trihydrate: 6131-90-4  ☒N
3D model ( JSmol )
  • anhydrous: Interactive image
Beilstein Reference
3595639
ChEBI
  • anhydrous: CHEBI:32954  ☑Y
  • trihydrate: CHEBI:32138
ChEMBL
  • anhydrous: ChEMBL1354  ☑Y
ChemSpider
  • anhydrous: 29105  ☑Y
ECHA InfoCard 100.004.386
EC Number204-823-8
E numberE262 (preservatives)
Gmelin Reference
20502
KEGG
  • trihydrate: D01779
PubChem CID
  • anhydrous: 517045
  • trihydrate: 23665404
RTECS numberAJ4300010 (anhydrous)
AJ4580000
UNII
  • anhydrous: NVG71ZZ7P0  ☑Y
  • trihydrate: 4550K0SC9B
InChI
  • InChI=1S/C2H4O2.Na/c1-2(3)4;/h1H3,(H,3,4);/q;+1/p-1 ☑Y
    Key: VMHLLURERBWHNL-UHFFFAOYSA-M ☑Y
  • anhydrous: InChI=1/C2H4O2.Na/c1-2(3)4;/h1H3,(H,3,4);/q;+1/p-1
    Key: VMHLLURERBWHNL-REWHXWOFAT
SMILES
  • anhydrous: [Na+].[O-]C(=O)C
Properties
Chemical formula
NaC₂H₃O₂
AppearanceWhite deliquescent powder
OdorVinegar (acetic acid) odor when heated to decomposition [1]
Density1.528 g/cm3 (20 °C, anhydrous)
1.45 g/cm3 (20 °C, trihydrate) [2]
Melting point 324 °C (615 °F; 597 K)
(anhydrous)
58 °C (136 °F; 331 K)
(trihydrate)
Boiling point 881.4 °C (1,618.5 °F; 1,154.5 K)
(anhydrous)
122 °C (252 °F; 395 K)
(trihydrate) decomposes
Solubility in water
Anhydrous:
119 g/100 mL (0 °C)
123.3 g/100 mL (20 °C)
125.5 g/100 mL (30 °C)
137.2 g/100 mL (60 °C)
162.9 g/100 mL (100 °C)
Trihydrate:
32.9 g/100 mL (-10 °C)
36.2 g/100 mL (0 °C)
46.4 g/100 mL (20 °C)
82 g/100 mL (50 °C) [3]
SolubilitySoluble in alcohol , hydrazine , SO2 [4]
Solubility in methanol16 g/100 g (15 °C)
16.55 g/100 g (67.7 °C) [4]
Solubility in ethanolTrihydrate:
5.3 g/100 mL
Solubility in acetone0.5 g/kg (15 °C) [4]
Acidity (pKa)24 (20 °C) [4]
4.75 CH3COOH [5]
Basicity (pKb)9.25
Magnetic susceptibility (χ)
−37.6·10−6 cm3/mol
Refractive index (nD)
1.464
Structure
Crystal structure
Monoclinic
Thermochemistry
Heat capacity (C)
100.83 J/mol·K (anhydrous) [6]
229 J/mol·K (trihydrate) [7]
Std molar
entropy (So298)
138.1 J/mol·K (anhydrous) [6]
262 J/mol·K (trihydrate) [2]
Std enthalpy of
formation (ΔfHo298)
−709.32 kJ/mol (anhydrous) [4]
−1604 kJ/mol (trihydrate) [2]
Gibbs free energy (ΔfG˚)
−607.7 kJ/mol (anhydrous) [4]
Pharmacology
ATC code
B05XA08 ( WHO )
Hazards
Main hazardsIrritant
Safety data sheet External MSDS
NFPA 704

NFPA 704 four-colored diamond

1
1
0
Flash point>250 °C (482 °F; 523 K) [5]
Autoignition
temperature
600 °C (1,112 °F; 873 K) [5]
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
LD50 ( median dose )
3530 mg/kg (oral, rat)
Related compounds
Other anions
Sodium formate
Sodium propionate
Other cations
Potassium acetate
Calcium acetate
Related compounds
Sodium diacetate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N  verify  ( what is  ☑Y☒N ?)
Infobox references

Sodium acetate, NaCH3COO, also abbreviated Na O Ac , [8] is the sodium salt of acetic acid . This colorless deliquescent salt has a wide range of uses.

Contents

  • 1 Applications
    • 1.1 Industrial
    • 1.2 Concrete longevity
    • 1.3 Food
    • 1.4 Buffer solution
    • 1.5 Heating pad
  • 2 Preparation
  • 3 Reactions
  • 4 References
  • 5 External links

Applications[ edit ]

Industrial[ edit ]

Sodium acetate is used in the textile industry to neutralize sulfuric acid waste streams and also as a photoresist while using aniline dyes . It is also a pickling agent in chrome tanning and helps to impede vulcanization of chloroprene in synthetic rubber production. In processing cotton for disposable cotton pads, sodium acetate is used to eliminate the buildup of static electricity.

Concrete longevity[ edit ]

Sodium acetate is used to mitigate water damage to concrete by acting as a concrete sealant , while also being environmentally benign and cheaper than the commonly used epoxy alternative for sealing concrete against water permeation . [9]

Food[ edit ]

Sodium acetate may be added to food as a seasoning, sometimes in the form of sodium diacetate , a one-to-one complex of sodium acetate and acetic acid, [10] given the E-number E262. It is often used to give potato chips a salt and vinegar flavor.

Buffer solution[ edit ]

As the conjugate base of acetic acid , a solution of sodium acetate and acetic acid can act as a buffer to keep a relatively constant pH level. This is useful especially in biochemical applications where reactions are pH-dependent in a mildly acidic range (pH 4-6).

Heating pad[ edit ]

A hand warmer containing a supersaturated solution of sodium acetate which releases heat upon crystallization

Sodium acetate is also used in heating pads , hand warmers , and hot ice. Sodium acetate trihydrate crystals melt at 136.4 °F/58 °C [11] (to 137.12 °F/58.4 °C), [12] dissolving in their water of crystallization . When they are heated past the melting point and subsequently allowed to cool, the aqueous solution becomes supersaturated . This solution is capable of cooling to room temperature without forming crystals. By pressing on a metal disc within the heating pad, a nucleation center is formed, causing the solution to crystallize back into solid sodium acetate trihydrate. The bond-forming process of crystallization is exothermic . [13] [14] The latent heat of fusion is about 264–289 kJ/kg. [11] Unlike some types of heat packs, such as those dependent upon irreversible chemical reactions, a sodium acetate heat pack can be easily reused by immersing the pack in boiling water for a few minutes, until the crystals are completely dissolved, and allowing the pack to slowly cool to room temperature. [15]

Preparation[ edit ]

A crystal of sodium acetate trihydrate (length 1.7 centimetres)

For laboratory use, sodium acetate is inexpensive and usually purchased instead of being synthesized. It is sometimes produced in a laboratory experiment by the reaction of acetic acid , commonly in the 5–8% solution known as vinegar , with sodium carbonate (“washing soda”), sodium bicarbonate (“baking soda”), or sodium hydroxide (“lye”, or “caustic soda”). Any of these reactions produce sodium acetate and water. When a sodium and carbonate ion-containing compound is used as the reactant, the carbonate anion from sodium bicarbonate or carbonate, reacts with hydrogen from the carboxyl group (-COOH) in acetic acid, forming carbonic acid . Carbonic acid readily decomposes under normal conditions into gaseous carbon dioxide and water. This is the reaction taking place in the well-known “volcano” that occurs when the household products, baking soda and vinegar, are combined.

CH3COOH + NaHCO3 → CH3COONa + H2CO
3
H2CO
3
CO
2
+ H
2
O

Industrially, sodium acetate trihydrate is prepared by reacting acetic acid with sodium hydroxide using water as the solvent .

CH3COOH + NaOH → CH3COONa + H2O

Reactions[ edit ]

Sodium acetate can be used to form an ester with an alkyl halide such as bromoethane :

CH3COONa + BrCH2CH3 → CH3COOCH2CH3 + NaBr

Sodium acetate undergoes decarboxylation to form methane (CH4) under forcing conditions (pyrolysis in the presence of sodium hydroxide):

CH3COONa + NaOH → CH4 + Na2CO3

Caesium salts catalyze this reaction.

References[ edit ]

  1. ^ “Sodium Acetate” . International Chemical Safety Cards. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. 2018-09-18.

  2. ^ a b c “sodium acetate trihydrate” . chemister.ru.
  3. ^ Seidell, Atherton; Linke, William F. (1952). Solubilities of Inorganic and Organic Compounds. Van Nostrand.
  4. ^ a b c d e f “sodium acetate” . chemister.ru.
  5. ^ a b c Sigma-Aldrich Co. , Sodium acetate . Retrieved on 2014-06-07.
  6. ^ a b Acetic acid, sodium salt in Linstrom, Peter J.; Mallard, William G. (eds.); NIST Chemistry WebBook, NIST Standard Reference Database Number 69, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg (MD), http://webbook.nist.gov (retrieved 2014-05-25)
  7. ^ Acetic acid, sodium salt, hydrate (1:1:3) in Linstrom, Peter J.; Mallard, William G. (eds.); NIST Chemistry WebBook, NIST Standard Reference Database Number 69, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg (MD), http://webbook.nist.gov (retrieved 2014-05-25)
  8. ^ Clayden, Jonathan ; Greeves, Nick; Warren, Stuart ; Wothers, Peter (2001). Organic Chemistry (1st ed.). Oxford University Press. ISBN   978-0-19-850346-0 .
  9. ^ “Potato Chip Flavoring Boosts Longevity Of Concrete” . Science Daily . 8 August 2007.
  10. ^ AG, Jungbunzlauer Suisse. “Sodium Diacetate – Jungbunzlauer” . www.jungbunzlauer.com.
  11. ^ a b Ibrahim Dincer and Marc A. Rosen. Thermal Energy Storage: Systems and Applications , page 155
  12. ^ Courty JM, Kierlik E, Les chaufferettes chimiques, Pour la Science, décembre 2008, p 108-110
  13. ^ “Crystallization of Supersaturated Sodium Acetate” . Journal of Chemical Education . 2015-07-19.
  14. ^ “Fake latent heat and supersaturation]” . www.atmos.washington.edu.
  15. ^ “How do sodium acetate heat pads work?” . HowStuffWorks . April 2000. Retrieved 2007-09-03.

External links[ edit ]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Sodium acetate .
  • Hot Ice – Instructions, Pictures, and Videos
  • How Sodium Acetate heating pads work
  • v
  • t
  • e
Sodium compounds
  • NaAlO2
  • NaBH4
  • NaBH3(CN)
  • NaBO2
  • NaBiO3
  • NaBr
  • NaBrO
  • NaBrO3
  • NaCH3COO
  • NaC6H5CO2
  • NaC6H4(OH)CO2
  • NaCN
  • NaCl
  • NaClO
  • NaClO2
  • NaClO3
  • NaClO4
  • NaF
  • Na2FeO4
  • NaH
  • NaHCO3
  • NaH2PO4
  • NaHSO3
  • NaHSO4
  • NaI
  • NaIO3
  • NaIO4
  • Na5IO6
  • NaMnO4
  • NaN3
  • NaNH2
  • NaNO2
  • NaNO3
  • NaOCN
  • NaO2
  • NaO3
  • NaOH
  • NaPO2H2
  • NaReO4
  • NaSCN
  • NaSH
  • NaTcO4
  • NaVO3
  • Na2CO3
  • Na2C2O4
  • Na2CrO4
  • Na2Cr2O7
  • Na2GeO3
  • Na2MnO4
  • Na3MnO4
  • Na2MoO4
  • Na2MoS4
  • Na2N2O2
  • Na2O
  • Na2O2
  • Na2O(UO3)2
  • Na2PO3F
  • Na2S
  • Na2SO3
  • Na2SO4
  • Na2S2O3
  • Na2S2O4
  • Na2S2O5
  • Na2S2O6
  • Na2S2O7
  • Na2S2O8
  • Na2S4O6
  • Na2Se
  • Na2SeO3
  • Na2SeO4
  • Na2SiO3
  • Na2Si2O5
  • Na4SiO4
  • Na2Te
  • Na2TeO3
  • Na2TeO4
  • Na2Po
  • Na2Ti3O7
  • Na2U2O7
  • Na2WO4
  • Na2Zn(OH)4
  • Na3N
  • Na3P
  • Na3PO4
  • Na3VO4
  • Na4Fe(CN)6
  • Na4P3O7
  • Na5P3O10
Chemical formulas
  • v
  • t
  • e
Acetyl halides and salts of the acetate ion
AcOHHe
LiOAc Be(OAc)2
BeAcOH
B(OAc)3 AcOAc
ROAc
NH4OAc AcOOH FAcNe
NaOAc Mg(OAc)2 Al(OAc)3
ALSOL
Al(OAc)2OH
Al2SO4(OAc)4
SiPS ClAcAr
KOAc Ca(OAc)2 Sc(OAc)3 Ti(OAc)4 VO(OAc)3 Cr(OAc)2
Cr(OAc)3
Mn(OAc)2
Mn(OAc)3
Fe(OAc)2
Fe(OAc)3
Co(OAc)2 ,
Co(OAc)3
Ni(OAc)2 Cu(OAc)2 Zn(OAc)2 Ga(OAc)3Ge As(OAc)3Se BrAcKr
RbOAc Sr(OAc)2 Y(OAc)3 Zr(OAc)4Nb Mo(OAc)2Tc Ru(OAc)2
Ru(OAc)3
Ru(OAc)4
Rh2(OAc)4 Pd(OAc)2 AgOAc Cd(OAc)2In Sn(OAc)2
Sn(OAc)4
Sb(OAc)3Te IAcXe
CsOAc Ba(OAc)2 HfTaWReOsIr Pt(OAc)2Au Hg2(OAc)2 ,
Hg(OAc)2
TlOAc
Tl(OAc)3
Pb(OAc)2
Pb(OAc)4
Bi(OAc)3PoAtRn
FrRa RfDbSgBhHsMtDsRgCnNhFlMcLvTsOg
La(OAc)3 Ce(OAc)xPrNdPm Sm(OAc)3 Eu(OAc)3 Gd(OAc)3Tb Dy(OAc)3 Ho(OAc)3ErTm Yb(OAc)3 Lu(OAc)3
AcThPa UO2(OAc)2NpPuAmCmBkCfEsFmMdNoLr

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