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Snopes.com

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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“Snopes” redirects here. For the novels by William Faulkner, see Snopes trilogy .
It has been requested that the title of this article be changed  to Snopes . Please see the relevant discussion on the discussion page . Do not move the page until the discussion has reached consensus for the change and is closed.
Website covering urban legends, Internet rumors, e-mail forwards, and other stories of unknown or questionable origin

Snopes.com
Snopes logo
Type of site
Reference pages
Owner
  • David P. Mikkelson [1]
  • Proper Media [2]
Created byBarbara Mikkelson
David P. Mikkelson [1]
Website snopes.com
Alexa rankNegative increase 2,573 (US 752) (December 2018 [update] ) [3]
CommercialYes
RegistrationRequired only on forums
Launched1994; 24 years ago (1994) (as Urban Legends Reference Pages)
Current statusActive

Snopes.com /snps/ , formally known as the Urban Legends Reference Pages, is one of the first online fact-checking websites. [4] It has been termed a “well-regarded source for sorting out myths and rumors” on the internet. [5] [6] It has also been seen as a source for validating and debunking urban legends and similar stories in American popular culture . [7]

Contents

  • 1 History
  • 2 Main site
  • 3 Lost legends
  • 4 Accuracy
  • 5 Funding
  • 6 Traffic and users
  • 7 See also
  • 8 References
  • 9 External links

History[ edit ]

In 1994, [8] David and Barbara Mikkelson created an urban folklore web site that would become Snopes.com. Snopes was an early online encyclopedia focused on urban legends, that mainly presented search results of user discussions. The site grew to encompass a wide range of subjects and became a resource to which Internet users began submitting pictures and stories of questionable veracity. According to the Mikkelsons, Snopes predated the search engine concept where people could go to check facts by searches. [9] David Mikkelson had originally adopted the username “Snopes” (the name of a family of often unpleasant people in the works of William Faulkner ) [10] [11] as a username in the Usenet newsgroup alt.folklore.urban. [12] [13] [11] [13]

In 2002, the site had become well known enough that a television pilot called Snopes: Urban Legends was completed with American actor Jim Davidson as host. However, it did not air on major networks. [11] Christopher Richmond and Drew Schoentrup later became owners with Mikkelson through a partnership with the founders of a company called Proper Media. [14] By mid-2014, Barbara had not written for the site “in several years” [1] and David hired employees to assist him from Snopes.com’s message board. The Mikkelsons divorced around that time, and Barbara no longer has an ownership stake in Snopes.com. [1] [15]

On March 9, 2017, David Mikkelson terminated a brokering agreement with Proper Media, the company that provides Snopes with web development , hosting , and advertising support. [16] This prompted Proper Media to stop remitting advertising revenue and to file a lawsuit in May. In late June, Bardav—the company founded by David and Barbara Mikkelson in 2003 to own and operate snopes.com—started a GoFundMe campaign to raise money to continue operations. [17] They raised $500,000 in 24 hours. [18] Later, in August, a judge ordered Proper Media to disburse advertising revenues to Bardav while the case was pending. [19]

Main site[ edit ]

Snopes aims to debunk or confirm widely spread urban legends. The site has been referenced by news media and other sites, including CNN , [20] MSNBC , [21] Fortune , Forbes , and The New York Times . [22] By March 2009, the site had more than 6 million visitors per month. [23] Mikkelson runs the website out of his home in Tacoma, Washington . [24]

Mikkelson has stressed the reference portion of the name Urban Legends Reference Pages, indicating that their intention is not merely to dismiss or confirm misconceptions and rumors but to provide evidence for such debunkings and confirmation as well. [25] Where appropriate, pages are generally marked “undetermined” or “unverifiable” when there is not enough evidence to either support or disprove a given claim. [26]

Lost legends[ edit ]

In an attempt to demonstrate the perils of over-reliance on the internet as authority, Snopes assembled a series of fabricated urban folklore tales that it terms “The Repository of Lost Legends”. [27] The name was chosen for its acronym, T.R.O.L.L., a reference to the early 1990s definition of the word troll , meaning an Internet prank, of which David Mikkelson was a prominent practitioner. [12]

Accuracy[ edit ]

Jan Harold Brunvand , a folklorist who has written a number of books on urban legends and modern folklore, considered the site so comprehensive in 2004 that he decided not to launch one of his own to similarly discuss the accuracy or various legends and rumors. [13]

In 2012, FactCheck.org reviewed a sample of Snopes’ responses to political rumors regarding George W. Bush , Sarah Palin , and Barack Obama , and found them to be free from bias in all cases. [28] [29] In 2012, The Florida Times-Union reported that About.com ‘s urban legends researcher found a “consistent effort to provide even-handed analyses” and that Snopes’ cited sources and numerous reputable analyses of its content confirm its accuracy. [30] Mikkelson has said that the site receives more complaints of liberal bias than conservative bias, but added that the same debunking standards are applied to all political urban legends. [28]

Funding[ edit ]

Critics of the site have falsely asserted that it is funded by businessman and philanthropist George Soros , or linked sites. [2] Snopes declared in 2016 that its revenue was derived from advertising. In 2016, it also received an award of $75,000 from the James Randi Educational Foundation , an organization formed to debunk paranormal claims. In 2017, it raised approximately $700,000 from a crowd-sourced GoFundMe effort and received $100,000 from Facebook as a part of a fact-checking partnership. [31]

Traffic and users[ edit ]

As of December 2017, Snopes.com’s web traffic rank in the world stood at 3,798 with approximately 72% originating from the U.S. with web traffic declining from previous months. [32] As of April 2017 [update] , Snopes.com’s Alexa rating was 1,794. Approximately 80% of its visitors originate from within the United States . In 2017, the site attracted 20 million unique visitors in one month. [33] [34]

See also[ edit ]

  • icon Internet portal
  • TruthOrFiction.com
  • FactCheck.org  – A website that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics
  • The Straight Dope
  • The Skeptic’s Dictionary  – Collection of essays by Robert Todd Carroll
  • Mythbusters  – Australian-American science entertainment television program
  • List of common misconceptions

References[ edit ]

  1. ^ a b c d “How the Truth Set Snopes Free” . webbyawards.com.

  2. ^ a b Streitfeld, David (December 25, 2016). “For Fact Checking Website Snopes, a Bigger Role Brings More Attacks” . The New York Times. Retrieved December 27, 2016.
  3. ^ “Snopes.com Site Info” . Alexa Internet . Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  4. ^ “Snopes.com: Debunking Myths in Cyberspace]” . NPR . August 27, 2005. Retrieved August 27, 2005.
  5. ^ Melissa Allison, McClatchy-Tribune News Service, “Companies Find Rumors Hard to Kill on Internet,” ‘’Herald and Review,’’ Decatur, Illinois, March 4, 2007, image 3
  6. ^ Same article: “Corporations Combat Insistent Urban Legends on Internet,” The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, March 4, 2007, image 7
  7. ^ Henry, Neil (2007). American Carnival: Journalism Under Siege in an Age of New Media. University of California Press. p. 285. The most widely known resource for validating or debunking rumors, myths, hoaxes, and urban legends in popular American culture is the website run by Barbara and David P. Mikkelson at www.snopes.com…
  8. ^ “Triangulation 343 David Mikkelson, Snopes.com | TWiT.TV” . TWiT.tv. Retrieved 2018-04-25.
  9. ^ Brian Stelter (April 4, 2010). “Debunkers of Fictions Sift the Net” . The New York Times. Retrieved April 5, 2010.
  10. ^ “Frequently Asked Questions” . Snopes.com. Retrieved June 9, 2006. What are ‘snopes’?
  11. ^ a b c Bond, Paul (September 7, 2002). “Web site separates fact from urban legend” . San Francisco Chronicle . Retrieved July 17, 2012.
  12. ^ a b Porter, David (2013). “Usenet Communities and the Cultural Politics of Information”. Internet Culture . Routledge . p. 48. ISBN   978-1-135-20904-9 . Retrieved September 13, 2016. The two most notorious trollers in AFU, Ted Frank and snopes, are also two of the most consistent posters of serious research.
  13. ^ a b c Seipp, Cathy (July 21, 2004). “Where Urban Legends Fall” . National Review . Archived from the original on August 12, 2004. Retrieved February 7, 2014.
  14. ^ Bruno, Bianca (10 May 2017). “Fact-Checker Snopes’ Owners Accused of Corporate Subterfuge” . CNS. Courthouse News.
  15. ^ Madrigal, Alexis C. (24 July 2017). “Snopes Faces an Ugly Legal Battle” . The Atlantic. The Atlantic.
  16. ^ Farhi, Paul (July 24, 2017). “Is Snopes.com, the original Internet fact-checker, going out of business?” . The Washington Post.
  17. ^ Victor, Daniel (July 24, 2017). “Snopes, in Heated Legal Battle, Asks Readers for Money to Survive” . The New York Times.
  18. ^ “Snopes Meets $500K Crowdfunding Goal Amid Legal Battle” . Bloomberg. 2017-07-25. Retrieved 2017-12-18.
  19. ^ Dean, Michelle (2017-09-20). “Snopes and the Search for Facts in a Post-Fact World” .
  20. ^ Nissen, Beth (October 3, 2001). “Hear the rumor? Nostradamus and other tall tales” . CNN . Retrieved June 7, 2009.
  21. ^ “Urban Legends Banned-April Fools’!” . MSNBC . April 1, 2007. Retrieved June 7, 2009.
  22. ^ “Urban Legends Reference Pages: Who Is Barack Obama?” . Snopes. August 24, 2008. Retrieved January 22, 2008.
  23. ^ Hochman, David (March 2009). “Rumor Detectives: True Story or Online Hoax?” . Reader’s Digest. Archived from the original on March 18, 2009. Retrieved March 29, 2016.
  24. ^ Lacitis, Erik (October 10, 2018). “Lies, lies and more lies. Out of an old Tacoma house, fact-checking site Snopes uncovers them” . The Seattle Times . Retrieved November 6, 2018.
  25. ^ “Urban Legends Reference Pages: Frequently Asked Questions” . Snopes. Retrieved June 9, 2006. How do I know the information you’ve presented is accurate?
  26. ^ “Urban Legends Reference Pages: Round Rock Gangs” . Snopes. July 21, 2011. Retrieved May 3, 2009.
  27. ^ “Urban Legends Reference Pages: Lost Legends” . Snopes. Retrieved June 9, 2006.
  28. ^ a b “Ask FactCheck: Snopes.com” . FactCheck.org . April 10, 2009. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  29. ^ “Fact-checking the fact-checkers: Snopes.com gets an ‘A” . Network World . April 13, 2009.
  30. ^ Fader, Carole (September 28, 2012). “Fact Check: So who’s checking the fact-finders? We are” . The Florida Times-Union . Retrieved July 20, 2016.
  31. ^ “Disclosures” . Snopes.com. Retrieved 24 August 2018.
  32. ^ “snopes.com Traffic Statistics” . SimilarWeb. Retrieved 2018-01-29.
  33. ^ Stelter, Brian (April 4, 2010). “Debunkers of Fictions Sift the Net” . The New York Times . Retrieved March 19, 2013.
  34. ^ “Snopes.com Audience Insights – Quantcast” . www.quantcast.com.

External links[ edit ]

  • Official website Edit this at Wikidata
  • v
  • t
  • e
Urban legends ( list )
Theorists
  • Jan Harold Brunvand
Modern legends
  • Bloody Mary chant
  • The babysitter and the man upstairs
  • The Hook
  • Killer in the backseat
  • Poisoned candy myths
  • Vanishing hitchhiker
  • The Licked Hand
  • The Spider Bite
  • Choking Doberman
  • Baby Train
Websites
  • Snopes.com: Urban Legends Reference Pages
TV series
  • Mostly True Stories?: Urban Legends Revealed (2002–2004)
  • MythBusters (2003–2016)
  • Urban Legends (2007–present)
Films
  • Urban Legend (1998)
  • Urban Legends: Final Cut (2000)
  • Urban Legends: Bloody Mary (2005)

Retrieved from ” https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Snopes.com&oldid=871965505 ”
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      Edit links

      Does a New Facebook Algorithm Only Show You 26 Friends?

      Facebook hasn’t limited your feed to only a certain number of people, and sharing a post saying otherwise won’t make any difference.

      By Kim LaCapria

      Published 6 February 2018

      Claim

      A new Facebook algorithm only shows posts from about two dozen friends in your newsfeed.

      Rating

      False
      About this rating

      Origin

      In December 2017, rumors that a new Facebook algorithm was restricting the number of friends whose content appears in users’ newsfeeds hit the social media network:

      😬I was wondering why my news feed felt so different lately… Just found out, Facebook has another new algorithm. 🙄 It seems like I only see the same small handful of my friends on my newsfeed anymore (whom I love)… so I’m doing a simple check, with your help! 🙌🏽💖

      Can everybody do me a quick favor, pretty please?? 🙏🏼

      If you’re seeing this, leave me a comment – just a quick “Hey” or your favorite emoji would be great. The more interaction you have with people, the more friends will show up on your feed.

      Otherwise Facebook CHOOSES who you see.

      The following post is circulating among my friends on Facebook. Is it true?

      ** 🌈Important ** Once you comment, you are welcome to turn OFF notifications for this post so you don’t see all the comments after you.

      ❤️Thank You!! I really appreciate it because I want to see as many of you as possible, and know what’s going on in all my friend’s lives! ✨🤸🏻‍♂️🎉

      Feel free to copy and paste to your own wall so you can have more interaction as well!

      Excited to see more about YOUR life again 😍

      xoxo

      Although the content and claim were largely the same, another version of this rumor that spread a month later held that the algorithm specifically pared down the content in a user’s newsfeed to posts from either 25 or 26 friends:

      My friends are littering my Facebook feed with this… true or false?:

      “How to avoid hearing from the same 26 FB friends and nobody else:
      Newsfeed recently shows only posts from the same few people, about 25, repeatedly the same, because Facebook has a new algorithm.

      Their system chooses the people to read Your post. However, I would like to choose for myself: if you read this message leave me a quick comment, a “hi”, a sticker, whatever you want, so you will appear in my News Feed. I MISS YOU!

      Do not hesitate to copy and paste on your wall so you can have more interaction with all your contacts and bypass the system. That’s why we don’t see all posts from our friends.

      Some versions even claimed, inaccurately, that we had verified the purported new Facebook algorithm exists:

      facebook 26 algorithm

      The truth is that no one seems to know exactly how Facebook’s algorithms work. Slate described the manner in which the social media network determines the order of content in any feed as “surprisingly inelegant, maddeningly mercurial, and stubbornly opaque.”

      The rumors followed on the heels of an 11 January 2018 Facebook blog post that addressed changes to the service related to changes in the content mixture that users could expect to see in their newsfeeds:

      Today we use signals like how many people react to, comment on or share posts to determine how high they appear in News Feed.

      With this update, we will also prioritize posts that spark conversations and meaningful interactions between people. To do this, we will predict which posts you might want to interact with your friends about, and show these posts higher in feed. These are posts that inspire back-and-forth discussion in the comments and posts that you might want to share and react to — whether that’s a post from a friend seeking advice, a friend asking for recommendations for a trip, or a news article or video prompting lots of discussion.

      We will also prioritize posts from friends and family over public content, consistent with our News Feed values.

      However, these changes were described as affecting content generated by businesses and publishers, not individual friends and family members, and the only disclosures made about those changes were that they were intended to increase (not limit) interactions with friends and family:

      But recently we’ve gotten feedback from our community that public content — posts from businesses, brands and media — is crowding out the personal moments that lead us to connect more with each other … Since there’s more public content than posts from your friends and family, the balance of what’s in News Feed has shifted away from the most important thing Facebook can do — help us connect with each other.

      We contacted Facebook to ask whether the claim of limiting personal interactions had merit, and a representative told us that the rumor held no water (which is in keeping with our own observations). As with other viral posts aiming to “ trick ” Facebook’s algorithm, this rumor is both misguided and ineffective.

      Sources

      • Mosseri, Adam.   “News Feed FYI: Bringing People Closer Together.”
            Facebook Newsroom.   11 January 2018.

      • Oremas, Will.   “Who Controls Your Facebook Feed.”
            Slate.com.   3 January 2016.

      By Kim LaCapria

      Published 6 February 2018

      Filed Under

      algorithms

      ,

      facebook

      ,

      facebook algorithms

      Dear Reader,

      Snopes.com has long been engaged in the battle against misinformation, an effort we could not sustain without support from our audience. Producing reliable fact-checking and thorough investigative reporting requires significant resources. We pay writers, editors, web developers, and other staff who work tirelessly to provide you with an invaluable service: evidence-based, contextualized analysis of facts. Help us keep Snopes.com strong. Make a direct contribution today. Learn More .

      Donate with PayPal

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      Did a Millionaire Fire His Bank Because It Did Not Validate Parking?

      Next time a clerk looks down his nose at you, tell him about John Barrier and the Washington State bank.

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      Did Netflix Announce They Will Be Removing ‘Friends’ from Their Streaming Catalog?

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      4 December 2018

      The online streaming service caused consternation in December 2018 when they briefly signalled the hit 90’s sitcom would no longer be available after 1 January 2019.

      Did Smirnoff Troll President Trump in a Vodka Advertisement?

      Did Smirnoff Troll President Trump in a Vodka Advertisement?

      4 December 2018

      A genuine advertisement for Smirnoff vodka used the tagline “Made in America but we’d be happy to talk about our ties to Russia under oath.”

      Was It Illegal to Profit from Healthcare Prior to the HMO Act of 1973?

      Was It Illegal to Profit from Healthcare Prior to the HMO Act of 1973?

      4 December 2018

      While there are myriad arguments to be made that the legislation contributed to expansion of for-profit insurance companies, the HMO Act of 1973 is misrepresented in memes.

      Were Immigrants at the U.S.-Mexico Border Photographed with Numbers Written on Their Arms?

      Were Immigrants at the U.S.-Mexico Border Photographed with Numbers Written on Their Arms?

      3 December 2018

      A photograph taken near the border spurred disturbing comparisons to atrocities committed by Nazi Germany.

      Does This Video Show Eminem’s Daughter Rapping?

      Does This Video Show Eminem’s Daughter Rapping?

      3 December 2018

      A viral video has the internet wondering about the child Eminem once sang an ode to.

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        Will Looking at This Image Reveal How Stressed You Are?

        Will Looking at This Image Reveal How Stressed You Are?

        1 December 2018

        It’s mostly having to deal with stuff like this that stresses us out.

        Did TBS Cancel Their ‘Christmas Story’ Marathon Due to Its Bullying Scene?

        Did TBS Cancel Their ‘Christmas Story’ Marathon Due to Its Bullying Scene?

        28 November 2018

        The classic 1983 holiday film about the adventures of Ralphie Parker famously contains a confrontation with bully Scut Farkus.

        Did a Male Rapist Who Identifies as Female Transfer to a Women’s Jail and Assault Female Inmates?

        Did a Male Rapist Who Identifies as Female Transfer to a Women’s Jail and Assault Female Inmates?

        30 November 2018

        Karen White, formerly Stephen Woods, confessed not only to abusing fellow inmates in a West Yorkshire women’s jail, but to committing rape years earlier when she still identified as a male.

        Did the Obama Administration Use Tear Gas Once a Month at the Border?

        Did the Obama Administration Use Tear Gas Once a Month at the Border?

        27 November 2018

        Conservative web sites accurately presented the frequency of tear gas use during the final five years of Barack Obama’s presidency, from 2012 to 2016.

        Did a 5G Cellular Network Test Cause Hundreds of Birds to Die?

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        13 November 2018

        The theory that a 5G network test caused the unexplained death of birds in The Hague relies on such a test’s actually having taken place.

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        Did All Democrats Vote Against a 2.8 Percent Social Security COLA Increase?

        Did All Democrats Vote Against a 2.8 Percent Social Security COLA Increase?

        18 October 2018

        Social Security cost of living allowances are established by formula and don’t require Congressional approval.

        ‘Got Another Friend Request from You’ Facebook Warning

        ‘Got Another Friend Request from You’ Facebook Warning

        7 October 2018

        A warning about a Facebook user’s supposedly having received a second friend request from you is mostly useless.

        Is This a Photograph of Christine Blasey Ford with Bill Clinton?

        Is This a Photograph of Christine Blasey Ford with Bill Clinton?

        25 September 2018

        Dr. Christine Blasey Ford is apparently a Zelig-like figure who has met and posed with every prominent American liberal.

        Is This a Photograph of Christine Blasey Ford Partying?

        Is This a Photograph of Christine Blasey Ford Partying?

        23 September 2018

        Apparently any photograph of a woman semi-clothed and drinking can be used to smear the credibility of someone who reported a sexual assault.

        Did a ‘New Deadly Spider’ Species Kill Several People in the U.S. in the Summer of 2018?

        Did a ‘New Deadly Spider’ Species Kill Several People in the U.S. in the Summer of 2018?

        22 August 2018

        A viral, scare-mongering Facebook post fabricated a series of fatal spider bites and used photographs of the relatively harmless woodlouse spider.

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