mommy What is the plural of mother?


mommy

Discussion in ‘ Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés ‘ started by Lorena Ríos , Jun 16, 2008 .

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mommy

Discussion in ‘ Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés ‘ started by Lorena Ríos , Jun 16, 2008 .

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Posted by

u/tossawaytghyr65

3 years ago

Archived

Mommies or Mommie's

Looking for the grammar for the word mommies in the sentence "Mommies future golf pro…" mommies is referring to two mothers. So it will be "[two mother's] future golf pro…"

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level 1

natelyswhore22

8 points · 3 years ago

Mommies'

The instance in your example is a possessive, meaning the "future golf pro" belongs to the two mommies.

For singular nouns, the apostrophe goes between the word and the s. I.e. "The boy's dog" (one boy).

For plural nouns, the apostrophe goes after the "s" of the plural. I.e. "The parents' conferences".

Exceptions are singular words ending in an s just get the apostrophe added at the end, i.e. "The dress' hem". Another exception would be a plural with no s, which gets an apostrophe and then an s, i.e. "The children's hour".

level 2

gooddogisgood

2 points · 3 years ago

I think most people would write dress's hem. Your exception would apply to names of people, and usually reserved for historic or mythological names, like Xerxes' reign or Jesus' followers. It's a style choice though, so Bernie Sanders' speech or Sanders's speech are both acceptable. I've never seen common nouns use this convention, even long words like hippopotamus's teeth.

level 3

natelyswhore22

2 points · 3 years ago

That's interesting. I think I actually do the same, but for some reason yesterday I remembered the rule as being all nouns ending in s. I didn't get a ton of sleep the night before, so I'm going to use that as my excuse.

level 1

darthbecca

1 point · 3 years ago

Mommy's, if it is the possession of one mother. Mommies' if the possession of more than one mother. Even still, that looks terrible, and I agree with the earlier response that using mothers' for multiple mothers is better.

level 1

Taqwacore

-3 points · 3 years ago

mommies is referring to two mothers

Mommies' (plural possessive form, American English).

Mummies' (plural possessive form, actual fucking English).

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