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Seborrhea in Dogs: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Seborrhea, also known as Seborrheic Dermatitis, is a common skin disorder in dogs that causes the skin to flake and become oily or greasy. With seborrhea, the sebaceous glands of the skin produce an excessive amount of sebum. The excess sebum is what gives off that doggy smell everyone complains about.

Types and Symptoms

There are two common forms of seborrhea; a dry (sicca) form and oily (oleosa) form, but most have a combination of dry and oily seborrhea. Areas that are rich in sebaceous glands like the back, face, and flanks are most affected. In these areas you will notice scales, flakiness, itchiness, and red skin. There will also be an odor associated with seborrhea which worsens with secondary bacterial and/or yeast infection. Sebum, bacteria and yeast make living with a dog difficult because of the smell!

Causes

Seborrhea is often a secondary condition. Primary conditions or diseases include allergies, endocrine disorders, dietary deficiencies, malabsorption disorders, parasites, and autoimmune disorders. Seborrhea can also be an inherited disorder. If this is the case, it usually afflicts animals before they reach two years of age. Breeds most commonly afflicted with inherited seborrhea include West Highland White Terriers, American Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels, Basset Hounds, Dachshunds, Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers and Shar-Peis.

Treatment

  • Use Vet Basics® Sebo Plus Shampoo twice a week for two weeks then weekly until under control. Sebo Plus Shampoo will hydrate the skin while healing the itch. It combines two ingredients to help solve this issue, benzoyl peroxide and micronized sulfur.
  • Use Vet Basics® ChlorConazole topical spray daily in the worst areas. It kills yeast and bacteria. We can’t shampoo daily, but we can spray needed areas every day while treating.
  • Antibiotics for any secondary infections are helpful. Most treat the bacteria with Cephalexin and allow the topical to control the yeast.
  • To promote a healthy skin and coat from the inside out, follow with Doc Roy’s® Derma Coat Plus . Derma Coat will add the microessentials and antioxidants to help grow and maintain healthy skin. You’re going to have a challenge getting the next healthy coat in, and Derma Coat Plus will give you an edge on success here. A healthy coat and soft skin will resist this issue better in the future.

Skin Fold Dermatitis

Skin fold dermatitis of the face is common in Bulldogs and other pushed-in nose breeds with excess skin folds. Treating around the eyes is tricky but these two products will help.

  • Use Nu-Stock for any areas that look like they need a little extra healing or rejuvenation. It is non-toxic, stops itching immediately and promotes hair growth
  • Vet Basics® ChlorConazole Wipes are easy to use close to the eyes and facial folds. Just wipe the folds daily with the medicated wipe and toss in the trash.

If you need help, call us at 800.786.4751 .

-Dr. B
Don Bramlage, DVM, Director of Veterinary Services at Revival Animal Health

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The materials, information and answers provided through this website are not intended to replace the medical advice or services of your personal veterinarian or other pet health care professional. Consult your own veterinarian for answers to specific medical questions, including diagnosis, treatment, therapy or medical attention.

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Find information on animal health topics, written for the veterinary professional.


  • Veterinary
  • Dog Owners
  • Skin Disorders of Dogs
Seborrhea in Dogs
  • Signs and Diagnosis

  • Treatment

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  • Resources In This Article

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Seborrhea in Dogs

By
Stephen D. White, DVM, DACVD, Professor and Chief of Service, Dermatology, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital; Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis

  • Skin Disorders of Dogs
  • Structure of the Skin in Dogs
  • Dermatitis and Dermatologic Problems in Dogs
  • Diagnosis of Skin Disorders in Dogs
  • Treatment of Skin Disorders in Dogs
  • Congenital and Inherited Skin Disorders in Dogs
  • Allergies in Dogs
  • Abscesses Between the Toes (Interdigital Furunculosis) in Dogs
  • Dermatophilosis in Dogs
  • Eosinophilic Granuloma Complex in Dogs
  • Fleas of Dogs
  • Flies and Mosquitoes of Dogs
  • Hair Loss (Alopecia) in Dogs
  • Hives and Rashes (Urticaria) in Dogs
  • Hygroma in Dogs
  • Hyperpigmentation (Acanthosis Nigricans) in Dogs
  • Itching (Pruritus) in Dogs
  • Lice of Dogs
  • Mite Infestation (Mange, Acariasis, Scabies) in Dogs
  • Nasal Dermatoses in Dogs
  • Parasitic Worms of the Skin in Dogs
  • Photosensitization in Dogs
  • Pyoderma in Dogs
  • Ringworm (Dermatophytosis) in Dogs
  • Seborrhea in Dogs
  • Ticks of Dogs
  • Tumors of the Skin in Dogs
  • Whole-body Disorders that Affect the Skin in Dogs

In dogs, seborrhea is a skin disease that is characterized by a defect in keratinization or cornification of the outer layer of the skin, hair follicles, or claws. Keratinization is the process in which the protective outer layer of skin is being constantly renewed by new skin cells. Seborrhea results in increased scale formation, occasionally excessive greasiness of the skin and hair coat, and often secondary inflammation and infection.

Primary seborrhea is an inherited skin disorder. It is seen most frequently in American Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels, Basset Hounds, West Highland White Terriers, Dachshunds, Labrador and Golden Retrievers, and German Shepherd dogs. Among dogs with seborrhea, there is usually a family history of the disorder, suggesting genetic factors are involved. The disease begins at a young age (usually less than 18 to 24 months) and progresses throughout the dog’s life.

Secondary seborrhea is a sign of an underlying disease that causes excessive scaling, crusting, or oiliness, often accompanied by pus-filled inflammation, infection, and hair loss.

Signs and Diagnosis

A diagnosis of primary seborrhea is reserved for dogs in which all possible underlying causes of seborrhea have been excluded. Most dogs with seborrhea have the secondary form of the disease. The most common underlying causes are hormonal disorders and allergies. The goal is to identify and treat these underlying causes. Allergies are more likely to be the underlying cause if the age of onset is less than 5 years. Hormonal disorders are more likely if the seborrhea begins in middle aged or older dogs. A lack of itching helps to exclude allergies, scabies, and other itching diseases. If itching is minimal, your veterinarian will seek to exclude hormonal disorders, other internal diseases, or other primary skin diseases. If itching is significant, allergies, scabies, and fleas will also be considered by your veterinarian.

Other important considerations in making a diagnosis include the presence of excessive urination, excessive drinking, heat-seeking behavior, abnormal estrous cycles, skin infections, the season, diet, response to previous medications, fungi or bacteria present, and the environment.

Your veterinarian will give your pet a thorough physical examination, including internal organ systems and a comprehensive skin examination. This is the first step in identifying the underlying cause. The skin examination documents the type and distribution of the abnormalities; the presence of hair loss; and the degree of odor, scale, oiliness, and texture of the skin and hair coat. The presence of follicular boils, papules (pimples), crusts, and other bumps usually indicates the existence of a superficial pyoderma (bacterial infection). Darkening indicates a chronic skin irritation (such as infection or inflammation), and skin thickening indicates chronic itching. Yeast infection will always be considered during this process.

Secondary infection is a problem for dogs with seborrhea. The keratinization abnormalities in seborrheic dogs usually provide ideal conditions for bacterial and yeast infections. The self-trauma that occurs in itchy animals increases the likelihood of a secondary infection. The infections add to the itchiness and are usually responsible for a significant amount of the inflammation, papules, crusts, hair loss, and scales. Samples of the affected areas are taken to identify the quantity and type of bacteria or yeast present. In a seborrheic dog with itching, the infection may cause all or most of the signs. Other diseases may be uncovered by clearing the infections. Thus, you should be sure to comply with any follow up examination requests made by your veterinarian.

Additional tests may also be necessary, including skin scraping, fungal and bacterial cultures, flea combing, skin biopsy, and blood and urine tests.

Treatment

Treatment is needed to keep your dog comfortable while the underlying cause is identified and secondary skin diseases are corrected. In addition to treating any secondary infections with antibiotics, medicated shampoos are often used to help control the seborrhea and speed the return of the skin to a normal state. Medicated shampoos can decrease the number of bacteria and yeast on the skin surface, the amount of scale and sebum present, and the level of itching. They may also help normalize skin cell replacement.

Most products contained in medicated shampoos can be classified based on their effects. Keratolytic products include sulfur, salicylic acid, tar, selenium sulfide, propylene glycol, fatty acids, and benzoyl peroxide. They remove excess dead skin cells. This reduces the scale and makes the skin feel softer. Shampoos containing keratolytic products frequently increase scaling during the first 14 days of treatment, due to the loosened scales getting caught in the hair coat. The scales will be removed by continued bathing. Keratoplastic products help normalize keratinization and reduce scale formation. Tar, sulfur, salicylic acid, and selenium sulfide are examples of keratoplastic agents. Emollients (lactic acid, sodium lactate, lanolin, and numerous oils, such as corn, coconut, peanut, and cottonseed) reduce water loss from the skin. They work best after the skin has been rehydrated and are excellent products after shampooing. Antibacterial agents include benzoyl peroxide, chlorhexidine, iodine, ethyl lactate, tris-EDTA, and triclosan. Antifungal ingredients include chlorhexidine, sulfur, iodine, ketoconazole, and miconazole. Boric and acetic acids are also used as topical antibiotics. Most medicated shampoos are a combination of these ingredients.

Follow the advice of your veterinarian regarding the most appropriate medicated shampoo for your pet with seborrhea. The selection of a medicated shampoo is based on hair coat and skin scaling and oiliness. Never use a shampoo formulated for people without the consent of your veterinarian.

Antibiotics are typically recommended for 3 to 4 weeks for bacterial skin infections. Fungal infections are common and are treated with antifungal medications.

For More Information

Also see professional content regarding seborrhea .

Resources In This Article

  • Figure 1
    Ear margin seborrhea
  • Skin Disorders of Dogs
  • Structure of the Skin in Dogs
  • Dermatitis and Dermatologic Problems in Dogs
  • Diagnosis of Skin Disorders in Dogs
  • Treatment of Skin Disorders in Dogs
  • Congenital and Inherited Skin Disorders in Dogs
  • Allergies in Dogs
  • Abscesses Between the Toes (Interdigital Furunculosis) in Dogs
  • Dermatophilosis in Dogs
  • Eosinophilic Granuloma Complex in Dogs
  • Fleas of Dogs
  • Flies and Mosquitoes of Dogs
  • Hair Loss (Alopecia) in Dogs
  • Hives and Rashes (Urticaria) in Dogs
  • Hygroma in Dogs
  • Hyperpigmentation (Acanthosis Nigricans) in Dogs
  • Itching (Pruritus) in Dogs
  • Lice of Dogs
  • Mite Infestation (Mange, Acariasis, Scabies) in Dogs
  • Nasal Dermatoses in Dogs
  • Parasitic Worms of the Skin in Dogs
  • Photosensitization in Dogs
  • Pyoderma in Dogs
  • Ringworm (Dermatophytosis) in Dogs
  • Seborrhea in Dogs
  • Ticks of Dogs
  • Tumors of the Skin in Dogs
  • Whole-body Disorders that Affect the Skin in Dogs


Ringworm (Dermatophytosis) in Dogs

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