jeffrey dahmer brother Precambrian: Facts About the Beginning of Time – Live Science - MywallpapersMobi

jeffrey dahmer brother Precambrian: Facts About the Beginning of Time – Live Science


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Geological events in the Precambrian era

Articlein Proceedings of SPIE – The International Society for Optical Engineering 5906 · August 2005with 149 Reads
DOI: 10.1117/12.624855

Abstract
The appearance of Bacteria, Eukaryotes, Metaphyta, Metazoa, etc., as well as the oxygenation of the atmosphere, took place much earlier than was formerly believed. The paleontological data clearly indicate that the difference in the surface temperature on the Earth from the Archaean to the present time was no more than 35-45° C.

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  • Fossil microorganisms in Archaean
    Chapter
    Full-text available
    • Aug 2006
    • Proceedings of SPIE
    • M. M. Astafieva

      M. M. Astafieva

    • Alexander Vrevsky

      Alexander Vrevsky

    • Richard Brice Hoover

      Richard Brice Hoover

    • Alexei Y. Rozanov

      Alexei Y. Rozanov

    Ancient Archaean and Proterozoic rocks are model objects for the investigation of rocks comprising astromaterials. Three types of fossil microorganisms found in Archaean rocks of Karelia are determined: 1. forms found in situ, in other words microorganisms of the same-age as the rock matrix, that is valid Archaean fossils, 2. endolithic fossil microorganisms, that is to say forms inhabited early formed rocks, and 3. younger than Archaean-Proterozoic mineralised microorganisms, that is later contamination. The structures belong (from our point of view) to the first type, or genuine Archaean forms were mainly under our examination. Practical investigation of ancient microorganisms from Greenstone-Belt of Northern Karelia turns to be very perspective. It shows that even in such ancient period as the Archaean an ancient diverse world existed. Moreover probably such relatively highly organised forms as cyanobacteria and perhaps eukaryotic forms existed in Archaean world.

  • The Early Earth and its environments
    Article
    Full-text available
    • Aug 2008
    • Proceedings of SPIE
    • M. M. Astafieva

      M. M. Astafieva

    • Richard Brice Hoover

      Richard Brice Hoover

    • Alexei Y. Rozanov

      Alexei Y. Rozanov

    The set of discovered Archaean organisms does not indicate anaerobic atmosphere as early as 3.5 Ga. The RNA-world must have existed at least at 3.9 GA and, likely, close to the beginning of degasification and appearance of water on the Earth surface. The earliest cellular organisms (membranes) also appeared before 4.0 Ga. Possibilities of evaluation of conditions on the Earth's surface are under the consideration of both geological-geochemical and possibly mainly paleontological data. The important element in the analysis of the Earth conditions is the level of organisms organization presented in the paleontological record, because it is connected with the existence of peculiar abiogenic conditions, such as temperature, amount of oxygen, amount of water etc.

  • Development of living organisms on the lava-water interface of Palaeoproterozoic Ongeluk lavas of South Africa
    Article
    Full-text available
    • Aug 2008
    • Proceedings of SPIE
    • M. M. Astafieva

      M. M. Astafieva

    • David H. Cornell

      David H. Cornell

    • Richard Brice Hoover

      Richard Brice Hoover

    • Alexei Y. Rozanov

      Alexei Y. Rozanov

    An investigation of the Early Proterozoic pillow lavas of South-Africa shows that the lava-water boundary is very interesting from the point of view of bacterial paleontology. In the pillow selvages corresponding to this boundary, forms such as bacteria (including cyanobacteria) developed. Cyanobacterial or bacterial mats formed and probably even such highly organized forms as eukaryotes existed.

  • The evolution of the early precambrian geobiological systems
    Article
    Full-text available
    • Dec 2009
    • Paleontol J
    • M. M. Astafieva

      M. M. Astafieva

    • Alexei Y. Rozanov

      Alexei Y. Rozanov

    Bacterial paleontology provides vast opportunities for the study of all types of sedimentary and volcanic-sedimentary rocks,
    at any stage of metamorphism and of any age. Bacteria are shown to play an important role in weathering, transfer, sedimentation,
    and diagenesis of the sediments and in the formation of many minerals that have previously been thought to be abiogenic.

  • Bacterial Paleontological study of Archaean of Karelia
    Article
    Full-text available
    • Dec 2009
    • Paleontol J
    • M. M. Astafieva

      M. M. Astafieva

    • Alexei Y. Rozanov

      Alexei Y. Rozanov

    Newly found biomorphic microstructures from the Upper Archaean (Lopian) rocks from Northern Karelia are described. Various
    microorganisms of a bacterial nature and even cyanobacteria (and possibly eukaryotic forms) are recognized. The importance
    of electron microscopy, along with traditional methods, for the study of the earliest manifestations of life in the Archaean
    and Early Proterozoic is emphasized.

  • On the early stages of the evolution of the geosphere and biosphere
    Article
    • Jul 2006
    • Paleontol J
    • N.L. Dobretsov

      N.L. Dobretsov

    • V. V. Suslov

      V. V. Suslov

    • N A Kolchanov

      N A Kolchanov

    The conditions necessary for the existence of nucleic-protein life are as follows: the presence of liquid water, an atmosphere,
    and a magnetic field (all of which protect from meteorites, abrupt changes in temperature, and a flow of charged particles
    from space) and the availability of nutrients (macro-and microelements in the form of dissolved compounds). In the evolution
    of the geosphere, complex interference of irreversible processes (general cooling, gravitational differentiation of the Earth’s
    interior, dissipation of hydrogen, etc.) with cyclic processes of varying natures and periodicities (from the endogenic cycles
    “from Pangea to Pangea” to Milankovitch cycles), these conditions have repeatedly changed; hence, in the coevolution of the
    geosphere and biosphere, the vector of irreversible evolution was determined by the geosphere. Only with the appearance of
    the ocean as a global system of homeostasis, which provided the maintenance and leveling of nutrient concentrations in the
    hydrosphere, and the conveyor of nutrients from the mantle, “the film of life” could begin its expansion from the source of
    the nutrients. Life itself is a system of homeostasis, but not due to the global size and a vast buffer capacity, but because
    of the high rate of reactions and presence of a program (genome) that allowed its development (ontogeny) independent from
    the outside environment. The early stages of the origin and evolution of the biosphere (from the RNA-world to the development
    of the prokaryotic ecosystems) were characterized by the domination of chemotrophic ecosystems. The geographical ranges of
    these ecosystems were directly or indirectly (through the atmosphere and hydrosphere) tied to the sources of nutrients in
    the geosphere, which were in turn connected to various sources of volcanic and geotectonic activity (geothermal waters, “black
    smokers” along the rift zones, etc.). This gave the biosphere consisting of chemotrophic ecosystems a mosaic appearance composed
    of separate local oases of life. The decrease of methane and accumulation of O2 in the atmosphere in the geological evolution of the Earth caused the extinction of chemotrophic ecosystems and directed
    evolution of the biosphere toward autotrophy. Autotrophic photosynthesis gave the biosphere an energy source that was not
    connected to the geosphere, and for the first time allowed its liberation from the geosphere by developing its own vector
    of evolution. This vector resulted in the biosphere forming a continuous film of life on the planet by capturing the continents
    and occupying pelagic and abyssal zones, and the appearance of eukaryotes. The geosphere formed biogeochemical cycles in parallel
    to the geochemical ones, and comparable in the annual balances of participating matter.

  • The oldest annelidomorphs from the upper Riphean of Timan
    Article
    • Mar 1998
    • DOKL EARTH SCI
    • M.B. Gnilovskaya

      M.B. Gnilovskaya

  • Fossil bacteria, sedimentogenesis, and the early biospheric evolution
    Article
    • Nov 2003
    • Paleontol J
    • A.Yu. Rozanov

      A.Yu. Rozanov

    The study of fossil bacteria suggests that the character of sedimentation in ancient epicontinental basins strongly depended on the abundance of microorganisms. At present, the appearance of eukaryotes, coelomates, etc., as well as the oxygenation of the atmosphere, took place much earlier than was formerly believed.

  • Megascopic algae 1300 million years old from the Belt Supergroup, Montana: A reinterpretation of Walcott's Helminthoidichnites
    Article
    Full-text available
    • Jan 1976
    • J Paleontol
    • John H. Oehler

      John H. Oehler

    • Dorothy Z. Oehler

      Dorothy Z. Oehler

    • Malcolm Walter

      Malcolm Walter

  • Macroscopic worm-like body fossils from the upper precambrian (900-700 Ma), huainan district, anhui, China and their stratigraphic and evolutionary significance
    Article
    • Jun 1986
    • PRECAMBRIAN RES
    • Wang Guixiang

      Wang Guixiang

    • Weiguo Sun

      Weiguo Sun

    • Zhou Benhe

      Zhou Benhe

    Abundant and varied, macroscopic, worm-like body fossils from the late Precambrian Liulaobei Formation, Huainan Group and the Jiuliqiao Formation, Feishui Group in the Huainan district, northern Anhui Province, China are further investigated through this progress report, after the initial discovery by Zheng Wenwu and a recent study by Wang Guixiang.Sinosabellidites Zheng in the Liulaobei Formation is a worm-like organism of questionable metazoan origin. It has merely a superficial resemblance with the tubes of late Vendian-early Cambrian true Sabelliditida but has much in common with the accompanying macroscopic algal remains of Tawuia Hofmann. Both Pararenicola Wang and Protoarenicola Wang are representatives of primitive worm-like animals in the Jiuliqiao Formation. Their macroscopic size, elongate cylindrical body, anterior aperture and apparatus, prominent and elastic annulations are characteristic for their metazoan origin, although they lack sufficient evidence for their definite relationship with any known kind of living worms.The Liulaobei Formation and the Jiuliqiao Formation are dated at about 850 Ma and 740 Ma, respectively. Regional geology and stratigraphic correlation and the occurrence of the distinctive Chuaria – Tawuia assemblage suggest a time range between less than 900 Ma and over 700 Ma for the whole shallow water marine sedimentary sequence of the Huainan and Feishui Groups; this latter group is disconformably covered by the drop-stone facies diamictites and tillites of the late Precambrian Luoquan Glaciation.Apart from the enigmatic Sinosabellidites, both Pararenicola and Protoarenicola are claimed to be the oldest multicellular animals so far discovered in the world and the first reliable evidence for the pre-Ediacarian evolutionary history of manifest metazoan life.

  • Fossil Microorganisms in Archaean deposits of Northern Karelia
    Article
    Full-text available
    • Feb 2005
    • M. M. Astafieva

      M. M. Astafieva

    • Alexander Vrevsky

      Alexander Vrevsky

    • Richard Brice Hoover

      Richard Brice Hoover

    • Alexei Y. Rozanov

      Alexei Y. Rozanov

    Newly found biomorphic microstructures from the Upper Archaean (lopian) rocks from Northern Karelia are described. The presence of various microorganisms of bacterial nature and even cyanobacteria (and possibly eukaryotic forms) is suggested. The necessity of employing methods of electron microscopy, as well as traditional methods, while studying the very early manifestations of life in Archaean and Early Proterozoic is noted.

  • Microbial Remains in Middle Proterozoic Rocks of Northern Australia
    Article
    Full-text available
    • Feb 2004
    • Proceedings of SPIE
    • Andy Wilde

      Andy Wilde

    • M. M. Astafieva

      M. M. Astafieva

    • Richard Brice Hoover

      Richard Brice Hoover

    • Alexei Y. Rozanov

      Alexei Y. Rozanov

    Investigation of the samples of the McArthur River complex ore deposit, one of the most zinc-lead mineralised provinces in the world, brings us to conclusion about the possibility of the biogenic origin of sulfides in McArthur River ore deposit and to make suppositions about the formation of the studied rocks in the photic zone of sea.

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The appearance of Bacteria sensu lato, Eukaryota, Metaphyta, Metazoa, etc., along with the oxygenization of the atmosphere,
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Newly found biomorphic microstructures from the Upper Archaean (lopian) rocks from Northern Karelia are described. The presence of various microorganisms of bacterial nature and even cyanobacteria (and possibly eukaryotic forms) is suggested. The necessity of employing methods of electron microscopy, as well as traditional methods, while studying the very early manifestations of life in Archaean … [Show full abstract] and Early Proterozoic is noted.

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