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Sonnet 149

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poem by William Shakespeare
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Sonnet 149

Detail of old-spelling text

The first two lines of Sonnet 149 in the 1609 Quarto of Shakespeare’s sonnets
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Q1

Q2

Q3

C

Canst thou, O cruel! say I love thee not,
When I against myself with thee partake?
Do I not think on thee, when I forgot
Am of myself, all tyrant, for thy sake?
Who hateth thee that I do call my friend?
On whom frown’st thou that I do fawn upon?
Nay, if thou lour’st on me, do I not spend
Revenge upon myself with present moan?
What merit do I in myself respect,
That is so proud thy service to despise,
When all my best doth worship thy defect,
Commanded by the motion of thine eyes?
But, love, hate on, for now I know thy mind;
Those that can see thou lov’st, and I am blind.

4

8

12

14

—William Shakespeare [1]

Sonnet 149 is one of 154 sonnets written by the English playwright and poet William Shakespeare .

It is considered a Dark Lady sonnet, as are all from 127 to 152.

Structure[ edit ]

Sonnet 149 is an English or Shakespearean sonnet . The English sonnet has three quatrains , followed by a final rhyming couplet . It follows the typical rhyme scheme of the form abab cdcd efef gg and is composed in iambic pentameter , a type of poetic metre based on five pairs of metrically weak/strong syllabic positions. The 8th line exemplifies a regular iambic pentameter:

 × / × / × / × / × /
Revenge upon myself with present moan? (149.8)
/ = ictus, a metrically strong syllabic position. × = nonictus.

The last line begins with a common metrical variant, an initial reversal:

 / × × / × / × / × /
Those that can see thou lov'st, and I am blind. (149.14)

Initial reversals are potentially present in lines 3, 4, and 14, and a mid-line reversal is potentially present in line 6.

The meter demands that line 2’s “cruel” be pronounced as two syllables, [2] and line 11’s “defect” (although a noun) be stressed on the second syllable. [3]

Notes[ edit ]

  1. ^ Pooler, C[harles] Knox, ed. (1918). The Works of Shakespeare: Sonnets . The Arden Shakespeare [1st series]. London: Methuen & Company. OCLC   4770201 .

  2. ^ Booth 2000 , p. 522.
  3. ^ Kerrigan 1995 , p. 382.

References[ edit ]

First edition and facsimile
  • Shakespeare, William (1609). Shake-speares Sonnets: Never Before Imprinted . London: Thomas Thorpe .
  • Lee, Sidney , ed. (1905). Shakespeares Sonnets: Being a reproduction in facsimile of the first edition . Oxford: Clarendon Press . OCLC   458829162 .
Variorum editions
  • Alden, Raymond Macdonald , ed. (1916). The Sonnets of Shakespeare . Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company . OCLC   234756 .
  • Rollins, Hyder Edward , ed. (1944). A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare: The Sonnets [2 Volumes]. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co. OCLC   6028485 .
Modern critical editions
  • Atkins, Carl D., ed. (2007). Shakespeare’s Sonnets: With Three Hundred Years of Commentary. Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press . ISBN   978-0-8386-4163-7 . OCLC   86090499 .
  • Booth, Stephen , ed. (2000) [1st ed. 1977]. Shakespeare’s Sonnets (Rev. ed.). New Haven: Yale Nota Bene . ISBN   0-300-01959-9 . OCLC   2968040 .
  • Burrow, Colin, ed. (2002). The Complete Sonnets and Poems. The Oxford Shakespeare . Oxford: Oxford University Press . ISBN   978-0192819338 . OCLC   48532938 .
  • Duncan-Jones, Katherine , ed. (2010) [1st ed. 1997]. Shakespeare’s Sonnets. The Arden Shakespeare , Third Series (Rev. ed.). London: Bloomsbury . ISBN   978-1-4080-1797-5 . OCLC   755065951 .
  • Evans, G. Blakemore , ed. (1996). The Sonnets. The New Cambridge Shakespeare . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press . ISBN   978-0521294034 . OCLC   32272082 .
  • Kerrigan, John , ed. (1995) [1st ed. 1986]. The Sonnets ; and, A Lover’s Complaint. New Penguin Shakespeare (Rev. ed.). Penguin Books . ISBN   0-14-070732-8 . OCLC   15018446 .
  • Mowat, Barbara A.; Werstine, Paul, eds. (2006). Shakespeare’s Sonnets & Poems . Folger Shakespeare Library . New York: Washington Square Press . ISBN   978-0743273282 . OCLC   64594469 .
  • Orgel, Stephen , ed. (2001). The Sonnets. The Pelican Shakespeare (Rev. ed.). New York: Penguin Books . ISBN   978-0140714531 . OCLC   46683809 .
  • Vendler, Helen , ed. (1997). The Art of Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press . ISBN   0-674-63712-7 . OCLC   36806589 .
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      Sonnet 149

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      Jessica Almarez

      on 24 February 2015

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      Transcript of Sonnet 149

      Sonnet 149
      basic facts

      sonnet 149/ 154
      William Shakespeare
      Elizabethian Age
      tragic love poem
      telegraph.co.uk
      language analysis
      Canst thou, O cruel, say I love thee not,
      When I against myself with thee partake?
      Do I not think on thee, when I forgot
      Am of myself, all, tyrant, for thy sake?
      Who hateth thee that I do call my friend?
      On whom frown’st thou that I do fawn upon?
      Nay, if thou lour’st on me, do I not spend
      Revenge upon myself with present moan?
      What merit do I in myself respect,
      That is so proud thy service to despise,
      When all my best doth worship thy defect,
      Commanded by the motion of thine eyes?
      But, love, hate on, for now I know thy mind;
      Those that can see thou lov’st, and I am blind.
      5
      10
      hyperbole
      ellipsis
      rhetorical question
      antithesis
      forgot
      think
      apostrophe
      hyperbola
      repetition of rhetorical questions
      repitition of "that i do"
      rhetorical question
      personification
      metaphor
      personification
      metaphor
      17 century
      "Shakespeare tries to handle his emotions "
      interpretation
      "say I love thee not"(line 1) – unknown lady accuses him of not loving her
      speaker tries to get her appreciation about his feelings
      speaker craves for her love (line 2 "partake")
      unknown lady just loves those that aren’t as devotet to her ("Those that can see thou lov’st" line 14)
      poor moral behavior of unknown woman ("tyrant" line 4)
      sources
      http://www.gradesaver.com/shakespeares-sonnets/study-guide/summary-sonnet-149-canst-thou-o-cruel-say-i-love-thee-not
      http://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/s/shakespeares-sonnets/summary-and-analysis/sonnet-149
      http://nfs.sparknotes.com/sonnets/sonnet_149.html
      http://wortwuchs.net/gedichtanalyse/

      Full transcript

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