ic 74hc595 Dracaena Marginata Info: How To Grow A Red-Edged Dracaena Plant

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15 houseplants for improving indoor air quality

By: Julie Knapp on Jan. 29, 2016, 1:07 p.m.

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Red-edged dracaena, Dracaena marginata

When you look closely at red-edged dracaena, you’ll see the lines that give it its name.

(Photo:
Miguel Pérez /flickr)

Red-edged dracaena (Dracaena marginata)

The red edges of this easy dracaena bring a pop of color, and the shrub can grow to reach your ceiling. This plant is best for removing xylene, trichloroethylene and formaldehyde, which can be introduced to indoor air through lacquers, varnishes and gasoline.

There are many dracaena plants. This distinctive version is distinguished by the purple-red edges on its ribbon-like green leaves. Although it grows slowly, it can eventually get as high as 15 feet tall, so maybe put it in a room with high ceilings and moderate sunlight, suggests This Old House .