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Definitions

subtopic

  Play sub·top·ic

noun

    The definition of a subtopic is something that is part of a broader area of discussion.

    If your paper is about poverty and there is a section of your paper devoted specifically to urban poverty, this is an example of a subtopic of your paper.

    YourDictionary definition and usage example. Copyright © 2018 by LoveToKnow Corp
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    “subtopic.” YourDictionary, n.d. Web. 29 November 2018. <https://www.yourdictionary.com/subtopic>.

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subtopic

a topic that is a division of a main topic

Webster’s New World College Dictionary, Fifth Edition Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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“subtopic.” YourDictionary, n.d. Web. 29 November 2018. <https://www.yourdictionary.com/subtopic>.

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subtopic. (n.d.). Retrieved November 29th, 2018, from https://www.yourdictionary.com/subtopic


subtopic

noun

One of the divisions into which a main topic may be divided.

THE AMERICAN HERITAGE® DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, FIFTH EDITION by the Editors of the American Heritage Dictionaries. Copyright © 2016, 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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MLA Style

“subtopic.” YourDictionary, n.d. Web. 29 November 2018. <https://www.yourdictionary.com/subtopic>.

APA Style

subtopic. (n.d.). Retrieved November 29th, 2018, from https://www.yourdictionary.com/subtopic

Noun

(plural subtopics)

  1. A subject that forms part of a topic .
    The meeting dragged on interminably as topics were divided into subtopics which were divided in to sub-sub-topics, ad infinitum.
Origin

From sub- +”Ž topic .

English Wiktionary. Available under CC-BY-SA license.
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MLA Style

“subtopic.” YourDictionary, n.d. Web. 29 November 2018. <https://www.yourdictionary.com/subtopic>.

APA Style

subtopic. (n.d.). Retrieved November 29th, 2018, from https://www.yourdictionary.com/subtopic


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    Words near subtopic in the dictionary


    • subtonics
    • subtopia
    • subtopian
    • subtopias
    • subtopic
    • subtopical
    • subtopics
    • subtorrid
    • subtotal
    • subtotal hysterectomy

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    Eight Semi-Painless Steps
    to Writing a Coherent
    Five Paragraph Essay

    Step 1: WRITE A TOPIC SENTENCE.
    Write a short, simple, declarative sentence without detail.
    For example,
    Topic sentence -- "Fairhope, Alabama is the best town in the world."	Put your topic sentence at the top of your paper.
    Step 2: WRITE 3 SUB-TOPIC SENTENCES ABOUT THE TOPIC SENTENCE.
    Write three sentences about the idea of the topic sentence. Make your
    three sentences short, simple, declarative sentences without detail.
    Take the topic sentence and ask "why" (for example, "Why is Fairhope,
    Alabama the best town in the world?") The answers to your "why" question
    should form the basis for your three sub-topic sentences.
    For example,
    Sub-topic sentence 1 -- "Fairhope has exciting places to go."
    Sub-topic sentence 2 -- "Fairhope is full of friendly people."
    Sub-topic sentence 3 -- "Fairhope is on the bay."	(Put Sub-topic sentence 1 right under your topic sentence.	Put Sub-topic sentence 2 half way down the front of your paper.	Put Sub-topic sentence 3 on the back of your paper at the top.)
    Step 3: WRITE 5 SUPPORTING SENTENCES ABOUT SUB-TOPIC SENTENCE 1, (Put them under sub-topic sentence 1.) WRITE 5 SUPPORTING SENTENCES ABOUT SUB-TOPIC SENTENCE 2, (Put them under sub-topic sentence 2.) and WRITE 5 SUPPORTING SENTENCES ABOUT SUB-TOPIC SENTENCE 3. (Put them under sub-topic sentence 3.)
    (So you're writing 15 new sentences to add to the 4 that you already have.)
    Make these fifteen supporting sentences longer and more complex with much
    more detail. Take each sub-topic sentences and ask the "why" question.
    The answers to your "why" questions should form the basis for your
    fifteen supporting sentences. (Remember, you are writing complete
    sentences, not fragments.)
    Step 4: REVISE THE SENTENCES THAT YOU HAVE SO FAR.
    Revise your 19 sentences looking for these particular problems: "you,"
    "thing," "stuff," "good," "nice," "neat," run-on sentences, fragments,
    and sentences ending in prepositions. Add more sentences if you want
    to. Replace vague and lifeless adjectives with colorful and descriptive
    adjectives. Add new adjectives.
    ___________________________________________________________
    Take a break. You now have 3 paragraphs. We will add the
    last two paragraphs soon enough.
    ___________________________________________________________
    Step 5: ORDER YOUR ESSAY
    Renumber your paragraphs (they look like sentence chunks at this point)
    according to their importance (from least to most, usually), or according
    to their chronological sequence. Once you have your three paragraphs
    (chunks) in order, go into the chunks and put the supporting sentences in
    order. At this point, you can mark out any supporting sentences that you
    don't need, and you can combine sentences that should go together.
    Step 6: ADD THE INTRODUCTION AND THE CONCLUSION	Add the introduction. The introduction is one sentence which
    combines your topic sentence with your three sub-topic sentences (put all
    the sentences in forward order). This one sentence will be the first
    paragraph of your essay. (Yes, you have my permission to have a
    paragraph with just one sentence.)
    For example,
    Introduction -- "Fairhope, Alabama is the best town in the world because
    it has exciting places to go, it is full of friendly people, and it is on
    the bay."	Add the conclusion. The conclusion is one sentence which
    combines your topic sentence with your three sub-topic sentences (this
    time, put the three sub-topic sentences in reverse order). This one
    sentence will be the last paragraph of your essay. (Yes, you have my
    permission to have another paragraph with just one sentence.)
    For example,
    Conclusion -- "Fairhope, Alabama is the best town in the world because it
    is on the bay, it is full of friendly people, and it has exciting places
    to go."
    You may now remove your topic sentence. It has served its purpose. Write
    your introduction and your conclusion on the back page of your rough draft,
    underneath your third paragraph. (You will put the introduction and the
    conclusion in their proper places when we get to step 8.)
    Step 7: REFERENCE YOUR PARAGRAPHS AND YOUR SENTENCES.
    Make sure that each paragraph has a clear reference to its preceding
    paragraph. There are a couple of ways to do this. A) You can use number words in your sub-topic sentences.	For example, "Second, Fairhope is a wonderful city because of its friendly people." B) You can include a few words from the preceding sub-topic sentence in your current sub-topic sentence.	For example, "Not only does Fairhope have exciting places to visit, but it also has friendly people."
    Also, make sure that your supporting sentences reference each other as
    well. You want to avoid choppiness. Use transition words like "next,"
    "then," "also," and "finally."
    A bad example: "My Aunt is one of the friendliest people I know. The
    people at the drug store are friendly." (Note the abrupt jump from one
    sentence to the next.)
    A good example: "My Aunt is one of the friendliest people I know. The
    people in the drug store are also friendly." (Note how the word "also"
    connects the two sentences and lessens the jump.)
    Finally, avoid writing "Last, but not least." Just write "last."
    Step 8: REVISE THE SENTENCES THAT YOU HAVE SO FAR.
    Make any revisions necessary for a smooth essay. Add more examples if you
    need them. Add vivid verbs and specific nouns. Add words that appeal to
    the five senses. Check your spelling with a dictionaary. Remove your
    paragraph numbers. Indent each paragraph. Once you are satisfied,
    rewrite the whole essay neatly and in order, then turn it in for a grade.
    Your introduction should be your first paragraph. Then write your middle
    three supporting paragraphs in order. Your conclusion should be your
    fifth paragraph. 

     

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