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Lend-lease

United States [1941]
Written By:

  • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
See Article History

Alternative Title:
Lend-Lease Act

Lend-lease, system by which the United States aided its World War II allies with war materials, such as ammunition, tanks, airplanes, and trucks, and with food and other raw materials. President Franklin D. Roosevelt had committed the United States in June 1940 to materially aiding the opponents of fascism , but, under existing U.S. law, Great Britain had to pay for its growing arms purchases from the United States with cash, popularly known as cash-and-carry. By the summer of 1940, the new British prime minister , Winston Churchill , was warning that his country could not pay cash for war materials much longer.

Read More on This Topic

Churchill, Winston; Truman, Harry; Stalin, Joseph

World War II: The beginning of lend-lease

On June 10, 1940, when Italy entered the war on the German side and when the fall of France was imminent, U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt declared that the United States would “extend to the opponents of force the material resources of this nation.”…

In order to remedy this situation, Roosevelt on December 8, 1940, proposed the concept of lend-lease, and the U.S. Congress passed his Lend-Lease Act in March 1941. This legislation gave the president the authority to aid any nation whose defense he believed vital to the United States and to accept repayment “in kind or property, or any other direct or indirect benefit which the President deems satisfactory.” Though lend-lease had been authorized primarily in an effort to aid Great Britain, it was extended to China in April and to the Soviet Union in September. The principal recipients of aid were the British Commonwealth countries (about 63 percent) and the Soviet Union (about 22 percent), though by the end of the war more than 40 nations had received lend-lease help. Much of the aid, valued at $49,100,000,000, amounted to outright gifts. Some of the cost of the lend-lease program was offset by so-called reverse lend-lease, under which Allied nations gave U.S. troops stationed abroad about $8,000,000,000 worth of aid.

Learn More in these related Britannica articles:

  • Churchill, Winston; Truman, Harry; Stalin, Joseph

    World War II: The beginning of lend-lease
    On June 10, 1940, when Italy entered the war on the German side and when the fall of France was imminent, U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt declared that the United States would “extend to the opponents of force the material resources of this nation.”…
  • Encyclopædia Britannica: first edition, map of Europe

    history of Europe: Planning the peace
    …the war ended, so did lend-lease—to be replaced by huge stopgap loans on ordinary terms. Britain received $3.75 billion, but only on condition that it make sterling freely convertible. As soon as it did, there was a run on the pound. The entire loan, it was reckoned, would have melted…
  • United States

    United States: The road to war
    His Lend-Lease Act, passed in March 1941 after vehement debate, committed the United States to supply the Allies on credit. When Germany, on March 25, extended its war zone to include Iceland and the Denmark Strait, Roosevelt retaliated in April by extending the American Neutrality Patrol…
  • United Kingdom

    United Kingdom: Labour and the welfare state (1945–51)
    …to do by law, ended lend-lease, upon which Britain had depended for its necessities as well as its arms. John Maynard Keynes, as his last service to Great Britain, had to negotiate a $3.75 billion loan from the United States and a smaller one from Canada. In international terms, Britain…
  • Mahan, Alfred Thayer

    20th-century international relations: From neutrality to active aid
    Roosevelt responded with lend-lease, a plan to “eliminate the dollar sign” by lending, not selling, arms. If your neighbour’s house is on fire, he argued, you do not sell him a hose, you lend it to him until the fire is out. “If Great Britain goes down,” he…

ADDITIONAL MEDIA

  • World War II: America Prepares for War

More About Lend-lease

8 references found in Britannica articles

Assorted References

    • major reference
      • In World War II: The beginning of lend-lease
    • establishment by Roosevelt and Congress
      • In Franklin D. Roosevelt: The third and fourth terms
      • In Pearl Harbor and the “Back Door to War” Theory: The revisionist case: From neutrality to war
    • United States presidential election of 1940
      • In United States presidential election of 1940: The general election

    effect on

      • Britain
        • In United Kingdom: Labour and the welfare state (1945–51)
      • Europe
        • In history of Europe: Planning the peace
      • World War II
        • In 20th-century international relations: From neutrality to active aid
        • In United States: The road to war

      External Websites

      • New Zealand Electronic Text Centre – Lend-Lease
      • United States Holocaust Memorial Museum – Holocaust Encyclopedia – Lend-Lease
      • United States History – Lend-Lease
      • Canadahistory.com – 1941 US Lend Lease Act
      • Spartacus Educational – Lend-Lease
      Britannica Websites
      Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students.
      • lend-lease – Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up)

      Article History

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