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Diverticulitis Diet: Foods To Avoid with Diverticulitis


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Digestive Disorders Health Center

  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Heartburn/GERD
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
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Diverticulitis

  • What Is Diverticulitis?
  • Diverticulitis Symptoms
  • Diverticulitis Treatment
  • The Diverticulitis Diet
  • Diverticulitis Prevention

Related to Digestive Disorders

  • Appendicitis
  • Celiac Disease
  • Chronic Constipation
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Diarrhea
  • Diverticulosis
  • Gallstones
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Peptic Ulcer Disease
  • More Related Topics
  • Digestive Disorders

  • Reference


Crohn’s Complications


Diverticulitis Diet

Articles OnDiverticulitis

Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis – Diverticulitis Diet

  • What Is Diverticulitis?
  • Diverticulitis Symptoms
  • Diverticulitis Treatment
  • The Diverticulitis Diet
  • Diverticulitis Prevention

Sometimes, especially as they get older, people can develop little bulging pouches in the lining of the large intestine. These are called diverticula, and the condition is known as diverticulosis .

When the pouches become inflamed or infected, it leads to a sometimes very painful condition called diverticulitis . In addition to having abdominal pain , people with diverticulitis may experience nausea , vomiting , bloating , fever, constipation , or diarrhea .

Many experts believe that a low-fiber diet can lead to diverticulosis and diverticulitis. This may be why people in Asia and Africa, where the diet tends to be higher in fiber, have a very low incidence of the condition.

Diverticulosis usually causes no or few symptoms; leaving many people unaware that they even have diverticula present.

Diverticulitis may need to be treated with antibiotics or, in severe cases, surgery.

Diet for Diverticulitis

If you’re experiencing severe symptoms from diverticulitis, your doctor may recommend a liquid diverticulitis diet as part of your treatment, which can include:

  • Water
  • Fruit juices
  • Broth
  • Ice pops

Gradually you can ease back into a regular diet. Your doctor may advise you to start with low-fiber foods (white bread, meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products) before introducing high-fiber foods.

Fiber softens and adds bulk to stools, helping them pass more easily through the colon . It also reduces pressure in the digestive tract.

Many studies show that eating fiber-rich foods can help control diverticular symptoms. Women younger than 51 should aim for 25 grams of fiber daily. Men younger than 51 should aim for 38 grams of fiber daily. Women 51 and older should get 21 grams daily. Men 51 and older should get 30 grams daily.  

Here are a few fiber-rich foods to include in meals:

  • Whole-grain breads, pastas, and cereals
  • Beans ( kidney beans and black beans, for example)
  • Fresh fruits (apples, pears, prunes)
  • Vegetables (squash, potatoes, peas, spinach)

If you’re having difficulty structuring a diet on your own, consult your doctor or a dietitian. They can set up a meal plan that works for you.

Your doctor may also recommend a fiber supplement, such as psyllium ( Metamucil ) or methylcellulose ( Citrucel ) one to three times a day. Drinking enough water and other fluids throughout the day will also help prevent constipation .

Continued

Foods to Avoid With Diverticulitis

In the past, doctors had recommended that people with diverticular disease (diverticulosis or diverticulitis) avoid hard-to-digest foods such as nuts, corn, popcorn, and seeds, for fear that these foods would get stuck in the diverticula and lead to inflammation. However, recent research has noted that there is no real scientific evidence to back up this recommendation.

In fact, nuts and seeds are components of many high-fiber foods, which are recommended for people with diverticular disease.

Pagination

Next In Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis Prevention

Top Picks

  • What to Do When Ulcerative Colitis Flares
  • Common Constipation Treatments
  • How to Treat a Crohn’s Flare
  • Newly Diagnosed With Crohn’s? Steps to Take
  • Restaurant Heartburn Triggers
  • Experimental Pill for Celiac Disease

further reading

  • Slideshow: Diverticulitis Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments
  • The Intestines (Human Anatomy): Picture, Function, Location, Parts, Definition, and Conditions
  • What Is Diverticulitis?
  • Diverticular Diseases & Diverticular Bleeding
  • Diverticulitis Prevention
  • The Basics of Diverticulitis
  • Treatment for Diverticulitis
  • Diverticulitis Topics

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  • Probiotic Supplements
  • Low Sugar Dairy Drink
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  • Affordable ED Meds
  • Improving Digestion
  • Valve Disease Treatment
  • Tips to Beat Heartburn

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  • Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer
  • Protect Yourself from a Bone Fracture
  • Test Your MS Care Routine
  • What’s New in Psoriasis Research
  • Sex When You Have Genital Psoriasis

Skip to main content

Digestive Disorders Health Center

  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Heartburn/GERD
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • News
  • Reference
  • Slideshows
  • Quizzes
  • Videos
  • Questions & Answers
  • Message Board
  • Find a Gastroenterologist

Diverticulitis

  • What Is Diverticulitis?
  • Diverticulitis Symptoms
  • Diverticulitis Treatment
  • The Diverticulitis Diet
  • Diverticulitis Prevention

Related to Digestive Disorders

  • Appendicitis
  • Celiac Disease
  • Chronic Constipation
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Diarrhea
  • Diverticulosis
  • Gallstones
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Peptic Ulcer Disease
  • More Related Topics
  • Digestive Disorders

  • Reference


Crohn’s Complications


Diverticulitis Diet

Articles OnDiverticulitis

Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis – Diverticulitis Diet

  • What Is Diverticulitis?
  • Diverticulitis Symptoms
  • Diverticulitis Treatment
  • The Diverticulitis Diet
  • Diverticulitis Prevention

Sometimes, especially as they get older, people can develop little bulging pouches in the lining of the large intestine. These are called diverticula, and the condition is known as diverticulosis .

When the pouches become inflamed or infected, it leads to a sometimes very painful condition called diverticulitis . In addition to having abdominal pain , people with diverticulitis may experience nausea , vomiting , bloating , fever, constipation , or diarrhea .

Many experts believe that a low-fiber diet can lead to diverticulosis and diverticulitis. This may be why people in Asia and Africa, where the diet tends to be higher in fiber, have a very low incidence of the condition.

Diverticulosis usually causes no or few symptoms; leaving many people unaware that they even have diverticula present.

Diverticulitis may need to be treated with antibiotics or, in severe cases, surgery.

Diet for Diverticulitis

If you’re experiencing severe symptoms from diverticulitis, your doctor may recommend a liquid diverticulitis diet as part of your treatment, which can include:

  • Water
  • Fruit juices
  • Broth
  • Ice pops

Gradually you can ease back into a regular diet. Your doctor may advise you to start with low-fiber foods (white bread, meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products) before introducing high-fiber foods.

Fiber softens and adds bulk to stools, helping them pass more easily through the colon . It also reduces pressure in the digestive tract.

Many studies show that eating fiber-rich foods can help control diverticular symptoms. Women younger than 51 should aim for 25 grams of fiber daily. Men younger than 51 should aim for 38 grams of fiber daily. Women 51 and older should get 21 grams daily. Men 51 and older should get 30 grams daily.  

Here are a few fiber-rich foods to include in meals:

  • Whole-grain breads, pastas, and cereals
  • Beans ( kidney beans and black beans, for example)
  • Fresh fruits (apples, pears, prunes)
  • Vegetables (squash, potatoes, peas, spinach)

If you’re having difficulty structuring a diet on your own, consult your doctor or a dietitian. They can set up a meal plan that works for you.

Your doctor may also recommend a fiber supplement, such as psyllium ( Metamucil ) or methylcellulose ( Citrucel ) one to three times a day. Drinking enough water and other fluids throughout the day will also help prevent constipation .

Continued

Foods to Avoid With Diverticulitis

In the past, doctors had recommended that people with diverticular disease (diverticulosis or diverticulitis) avoid hard-to-digest foods such as nuts, corn, popcorn, and seeds, for fear that these foods would get stuck in the diverticula and lead to inflammation. However, recent research has noted that there is no real scientific evidence to back up this recommendation.

In fact, nuts and seeds are components of many high-fiber foods, which are recommended for people with diverticular disease.

Pagination

Next In Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis Prevention

Top Picks

  • What to Do When Ulcerative Colitis Flares
  • Common Constipation Treatments
  • How to Treat a Crohn’s Flare
  • Newly Diagnosed With Crohn’s? Steps to Take
  • Restaurant Heartburn Triggers
  • Experimental Pill for Celiac Disease

further reading

  • Slideshow: Diverticulitis Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments
  • The Intestines (Human Anatomy): Picture, Function, Location, Parts, Definition, and Conditions
  • What Is Diverticulitis?
  • Diverticular Diseases & Diverticular Bleeding
  • Diverticulitis Prevention
  • The Basics of Diverticulitis
  • Treatment for Diverticulitis
  • Diverticulitis Topics

Today on WebMD

man holding his stomach

Digestive Myths

Get the facts on common problems.

blueberries in a palm

Diverticulitis Diet

Best and worst foods.

woman shopping

How to Live Gluten-Free

Learn what foods to avoid.

fresh and dried plums

Dietary Fiber

Will it help constipation?

Recommended for You

diverticuliltis illustration
Slideshow

What Is Diverticulitis?

couple eating at cafe
Article

Dining Out? Cut Calories, Heartburn

sick child
Slideshow

Tummy Troubles in Kids

Woman blowing bubble gum
Slideshow

Gum for Heartburn & Other Digestive Tips

Woman with crohns in pain
Slideshow

Crohn’s Disease Complications

Woman with stomach pain
Slideshow

What Is Celiac Disease?

diet for diverticulitis
Video

Diet for Diverticulitis

what causes diarrhea
Video

What Causes Diarrhea?

Tools & Resources

  • See an Appendectomy
  • How Heartburn Happens
  • Is My Constipation Serious?
  • IBS Triggers and Prevention
  • How to Choose a Biologic
  • 16 Tips for Good Digestion

Health Solutions

  • Nutritious Milk Substitute
  • Open Heart Alternatives
  • Cancer: Second Opinions
  • Penis Curved When Erect
  • Diarrhea Solutions
  • Severe Aortic Stenosis?
  • Benefits of Probiotics
  • Get Help with ED
  • Diabetes Management
  • Probiotic Supplements
  • Low Sugar Dairy Drink
  • How Drugs Rewire Brains
  • Affordable ED Meds
  • Improving Digestion
  • Valve Disease Treatment
  • Tips to Beat Heartburn

More from WebMD

  • Test Your Eye Health
  • Live Better With MS Assessment
  • What Is Endometriosis?
  • Yeast Infection Assessment
  • How Does Chemo Work?
  • Tips to Prevent Heartburn
  • Food After Chemo
  • What Meningitis Does to Your Body
  • Managing Diabetes at Work
  • Remedies for Heartburn
  • Avoid Allergy Triggers
  • Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer
  • Protect Yourself from a Bone Fracture
  • Test Your MS Care Routine
  • What’s New in Psoriasis Research
  • Sex When You Have Genital Psoriasis

Skip to main content

Digestive Disorders Health Center

  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Heartburn/GERD
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • News
  • Reference
  • Slideshows
  • Quizzes
  • Videos
  • Questions & Answers
  • Message Board
  • Find a Gastroenterologist

Diverticulitis

  • What Is Diverticulitis?
  • Diverticulitis Symptoms
  • Diverticulitis Treatment
  • The Diverticulitis Diet
  • Diverticulitis Prevention

Related to Digestive Disorders

  • Appendicitis
  • Celiac Disease
  • Chronic Constipation
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Diarrhea
  • Diverticulosis
  • Gallstones
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Peptic Ulcer Disease
  • More Related Topics
  • Digestive Disorders

  • Reference


Crohn’s Complications


Diverticulitis Diet

Articles OnDiverticulitis

Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis – Diverticulitis Diet

  • What Is Diverticulitis?
  • Diverticulitis Symptoms
  • Diverticulitis Treatment
  • The Diverticulitis Diet
  • Diverticulitis Prevention

Sometimes, especially as they get older, people can develop little bulging pouches in the lining of the large intestine. These are called diverticula, and the condition is known as diverticulosis .

When the pouches become inflamed or infected, it leads to a sometimes very painful condition called diverticulitis . In addition to having abdominal pain , people with diverticulitis may experience nausea , vomiting , bloating , fever, constipation , or diarrhea .

Many experts believe that a low-fiber diet can lead to diverticulosis and diverticulitis. This may be why people in Asia and Africa, where the diet tends to be higher in fiber, have a very low incidence of the condition.

Diverticulosis usually causes no or few symptoms; leaving many people unaware that they even have diverticula present.

Diverticulitis may need to be treated with antibiotics or, in severe cases, surgery.

Diet for Diverticulitis

If you’re experiencing severe symptoms from diverticulitis, your doctor may recommend a liquid diverticulitis diet as part of your treatment, which can include:

  • Water
  • Fruit juices
  • Broth
  • Ice pops

Gradually you can ease back into a regular diet. Your doctor may advise you to start with low-fiber foods (white bread, meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products) before introducing high-fiber foods.

Fiber softens and adds bulk to stools, helping them pass more easily through the colon . It also reduces pressure in the digestive tract.

Many studies show that eating fiber-rich foods can help control diverticular symptoms. Women younger than 51 should aim for 25 grams of fiber daily. Men younger than 51 should aim for 38 grams of fiber daily. Women 51 and older should get 21 grams daily. Men 51 and older should get 30 grams daily.  

Here are a few fiber-rich foods to include in meals:

  • Whole-grain breads, pastas, and cereals
  • Beans ( kidney beans and black beans, for example)
  • Fresh fruits (apples, pears, prunes)
  • Vegetables (squash, potatoes, peas, spinach)

If you’re having difficulty structuring a diet on your own, consult your doctor or a dietitian. They can set up a meal plan that works for you.

Your doctor may also recommend a fiber supplement, such as psyllium ( Metamucil ) or methylcellulose ( Citrucel ) one to three times a day. Drinking enough water and other fluids throughout the day will also help prevent constipation .

Continued

Foods to Avoid With Diverticulitis

In the past, doctors had recommended that people with diverticular disease (diverticulosis or diverticulitis) avoid hard-to-digest foods such as nuts, corn, popcorn, and seeds, for fear that these foods would get stuck in the diverticula and lead to inflammation. However, recent research has noted that there is no real scientific evidence to back up this recommendation.

In fact, nuts and seeds are components of many high-fiber foods, which are recommended for people with diverticular disease.

Pagination

Next In Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis Prevention

Top Picks

  • What to Do When Ulcerative Colitis Flares
  • Common Constipation Treatments
  • How to Treat a Crohn’s Flare
  • Newly Diagnosed With Crohn’s? Steps to Take
  • Restaurant Heartburn Triggers
  • Experimental Pill for Celiac Disease

further reading

  • Slideshow: Diverticulitis Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments
  • The Intestines (Human Anatomy): Picture, Function, Location, Parts, Definition, and Conditions
  • What Is Diverticulitis?
  • Diverticular Diseases & Diverticular Bleeding
  • Diverticulitis Prevention
  • The Basics of Diverticulitis
  • Treatment for Diverticulitis
  • Diverticulitis Topics

Today on WebMD

man holding his stomach

Digestive Myths

Get the facts on common problems.

blueberries in a palm

Diverticulitis Diet

Best and worst foods.

woman shopping

How to Live Gluten-Free

Learn what foods to avoid.

fresh and dried plums

Dietary Fiber

Will it help constipation?

Recommended for You

diverticuliltis illustration
Slideshow

What Is Diverticulitis?

couple eating at cafe
Article

Dining Out? Cut Calories, Heartburn

sick child
Slideshow

Tummy Troubles in Kids

Woman blowing bubble gum
Slideshow

Gum for Heartburn & Other Digestive Tips

Woman with crohns in pain
Slideshow

Crohn’s Disease Complications

Woman with stomach pain
Slideshow

What Is Celiac Disease?

diet for diverticulitis
Video

Diet for Diverticulitis

what causes diarrhea
Video

What Causes Diarrhea?

Tools & Resources

  • See an Appendectomy
  • How Heartburn Happens
  • Is My Constipation Serious?
  • IBS Triggers and Prevention
  • How to Choose a Biologic
  • 16 Tips for Good Digestion

Health Solutions

  • Nutritious Milk Substitute
  • Open Heart Alternatives
  • Cancer: Second Opinions
  • Penis Curved When Erect
  • Diarrhea Solutions
  • Severe Aortic Stenosis?
  • Benefits of Probiotics
  • Get Help with ED
  • Diabetes Management
  • Probiotic Supplements
  • Low Sugar Dairy Drink
  • How Drugs Rewire Brains
  • Affordable ED Meds
  • Improving Digestion
  • Valve Disease Treatment
  • Tips to Beat Heartburn

More from WebMD

  • Test Your Eye Health
  • Live Better With MS Assessment
  • What Is Endometriosis?
  • Yeast Infection Assessment
  • How Does Chemo Work?
  • Tips to Prevent Heartburn
  • Food After Chemo
  • What Meningitis Does to Your Body
  • Managing Diabetes at Work
  • Remedies for Heartburn
  • Avoid Allergy Triggers
  • Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer
  • Protect Yourself from a Bone Fracture
  • Test Your MS Care Routine
  • What’s New in Psoriasis Research
  • Sex When You Have Genital Psoriasis