Degenerate and non-degenerate semiconductors

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Question
Asked 3 years ago
profile/Luis_Villamagua2
Luis Villamagua
  • 17.44
  • Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja

What is a degenerate semiconductor?

Can anyone explain to me what a degenerate semiconductor is? How can I recognize when a semiconductor is a degenerate one? Can I find out this from the DOS pattern?
Luis

Semiconductor
Materials Science

Popular Answers ( 2 )

Chin-Sheng Pang
3 years ago
Chin-Sheng Pang
Purdue University

In terms of the doping, the answer provided above already grasp the point ! Generally speaking, with higher doping into the material, the fermi level (Ef) would move either closer to conduction band (Ec) or valance band (Ev) depending on which type of doping you added, which then gradually become degenerate condition.
While in terms of how to recognize it, one way is that you could calculate it and see if the value is corrected. When we assume non-degenerate condition, we may assume that the energy difference Ec-Ef  is greater than 3KT, so that our fermi distribution function could be simplified to exp[-(E-Ef)] or we could call Boltzmann distribution, which help us easily calculate the carrier densities. While if without any assumption and just calculate it, we have to use fermi dirac integral to calculate which is more complex and need to solve by program [Such as :  https://nanohub.org/resources/11396 ] or your could write a matlab code about it.
So the bottom line is that there would be value difference of your carrier densities when using Boltzmann distribution assumption to calculate or not. If you insist to assume non-degenerate condition even  Ec-Ef is just 1KT, then the value you calculate may be dramatically different from fermi dirac integral calculation, and it would be wrong to assume non-degenerate condition.
Btw, like Drude formula or Einstein relationship  are only valid under non-degenerate condition, so that indeed non-degenerate really help simplify things a lot. 

Peter Eyerer
3 years ago
Peter Eyerer
Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT

A degenerate semiconductor is a semiconductor with such a high level of doping that the material starts to act more like a metal than as a semiconductor.
look at  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Degenerate_semiconductor

All Answers ( 4 )

Peter Eyerer
3 years ago
Peter Eyerer
Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT

A degenerate semiconductor is a semiconductor with such a high level of doping that the material starts to act more like a metal than as a semiconductor.
look at  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Degenerate_semiconductor

Chin-Sheng Pang
3 years ago
Chin-Sheng Pang
Purdue University

In terms of the doping, the answer provided above already grasp the point ! Generally speaking, with higher doping into the material, the fermi level (Ef) would move either closer to conduction band (Ec) or valance band (Ev) depending on which type of doping you added, which then gradually become degenerate condition.
While in terms of how to recognize it, one way is that you could calculate it and see if the value is corrected. When we assume non-degenerate condition, we may assume that the energy difference Ec-Ef  is greater than 3KT, so that our fermi distribution function could be simplified to exp[-(E-Ef)] or we could call Boltzmann distribution, which help us easily calculate the carrier densities. While if without any assumption and just calculate it, we have to use fermi dirac integral to calculate which is more complex and need to solve by program [Such as :  https://nanohub.org/resources/11396 ] or your could write a matlab code about it.
So the bottom line is that there would be value difference of your carrier densities when using Boltzmann distribution assumption to calculate or not. If you insist to assume non-degenerate condition even  Ec-Ef is just 1KT, then the value you calculate may be dramatically different from fermi dirac integral calculation, and it would be wrong to assume non-degenerate condition.
Btw, like Drude formula or Einstein relationship  are only valid under non-degenerate condition, so that indeed non-degenerate really help simplify things a lot. 

James Sifuna
3 years ago
James Sifuna
The Technical University of Kenya

Hope this will assit
http://www.superstrate.net/pv/physics/degeneracy.html

Ahmad Hadi Ali
3 years ago
Ahmad Hadi Ali
Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia

You may also refer to this link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Degenerate_semiconductor

Can you help by adding an answer?
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